Dec 07, 2021  
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog

College Standards and Policies


Registrar’s Office
301 Culkin Hall
315-312-2136
registra@oswego.edu
www.oswego.edu/registrar

Graduation

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Policy on Filing for Graduation and Participation in the Graduation Ceremony

Students are advised that filing to graduate is a two-step process; (1) they must first apply to graduate and (2) they must complete a Senior Check Form with each of their declared major(s) and minor(s) advisor(s). Students must file an on-line degree application in order to be considered eligible for graduation.

Instructions to File Online: Sign in to myOswego; Click on the “Student Records” tab; Click on “Apply for Graduation”; Follow instructions on the Graduation Form.

Notification is sent to all students with second semester junior standing in both the fall and spring semesters with information regarding how and when to file on-line for graduation. Detailed instructions are available on the Registrar’s Office website. Once a student has filed to graduate, it is the student’s responsibility to meet with his or her advisor(s) for all majors and minors to complete the Senior Check Form. Senior check forms are also required for all students graduating from the College Honors Program. These forms should be filled out with the appropriate Honors Program advisor.  All graduation requirements, as stipulated by the College Catalog, should be reviewed at this time. Both the student and advisor must complete the Senior Check Form. It will be logged by the Registrar’s Office after it has been reviewed and completed. Completion of the Senior Check Form is mandatory for graduation. An individual graduation audit is completed for each student in order to certify the completion of all degree requirements. If requirements have not been met, the student is notified and his or her name is deleted from the graduation list. It is the student’s responsibility to notify the Registrar’s Office when the student plans to complete the requirements for their degree. Students must file on-line by the following dates in order to guarantee having their names printed in the commencement program:

April 1 for the December Graduation Ceremony
October 1 for the May Graduation Ceremony
February 1 for August graduates

Students who finish coursework during the spring semester must file as May graduates and attend the May ceremony.

Students who will complete degree requirements over the summer must file on-line as August graduates but are eligible to participate in the preceding May ceremony.

Students who finish coursework during the fall semester should file as December graduates and have the choice of attending either the December ceremony or the following May ceremony. Students completing in Winter Session must file as May graduates, and may petition to participate in the preceding December ceremony.

Diplomas are mailed to students several weeks after the graduation date.

Requirements

To be considered eligible for graduation a candidate must meet the following requirements:

  1. Complete all prescribed course work for the degree program with a minimum GPA of 2.00 with the exception of programs in Curriculum and Instruction, Technology, and Career and Technical Educator Preparation Departments which require a minimum GPA of 2.50. Calculation of the GPA in the major includes all courses in the defined program of study listed as requirements of the major.
  2. Complete the prescribed number of credit hours of course work for the curriculum in which enrolled with a minimum index of 2.00 with the exception of programs in Curriculum and Instruction, Technology, and Career and Technical Educator Preparation Departments which require a minimum GPA of 2.50. Some degree programs require a C- (C minus) grade or better in some or all major requirements. This information is included within each major program requirements.
  3. Complete a minimum of 60 credit hours from an accredited four-year institution, 30 credit hours of which must be earned at Oswego.
  4. Complete a minimum of one-half  of the major requirements at Oswego.
  5. Complete a minimum of 42 credit hours of course work at the 300- or 400-level.
  6. Satisfy all College obligations outstanding at the time of graduation.
  7. File the on-line degree application. The on-line application is found on myOswego under the Student Records tab, click on “Apply for Graduation.” Relevant application dates and deadlines are posted on the Registrar’s Office website.
  8. Complete a Senior Check Form with the student’s academic advisor(s). Senior check forms must be completed for each major and minor declared. Senior check forms are due as follows: May 1 for December graduation, December 1 for May graduation, April 1 for August graduation.
  9. For a minor to be noted on transcript at graduation, a student must have a minimum overall 2.0 GPA in all courses credited to the minor. In addition, a minimum of one-half of the minor requirements must be completed at Oswego.

Table II  summarizes the academic requirements for various degrees and majors which all students must meet in order to graduate.

Catalog Curricular Requirements

A student is permitted to graduate under the program of study in effect at the time of admission provided that the student’s attendance at the College is not interrupted by an absence of more than two academic years. If a student’s attendance is interrupted by an absence of more than two academic years, the student will be required to graduate under the program of study in effect at the time of readmission to the College. Approved off-campus study in overseas academic programs administered by SUNY Oswego, as well as internships, are considered study in residence.

Senior Honors

Academic honors are recognized at commencement for students who have earned at least 45 credits hours at Oswego prior to the semester preceding graduation (prior to the fall semester for December graduates and prior to the spring semester for May and August graduates).  Seniors who do not qualify for Latin honors prior to commencement, but who qualify at the end of their last semester will have the academic honor indicated on their diploma and final transcript.  GPA’s are not rounded up for any reason.

All seniors, including transfer students, must have completed at least 45 credit hours at Oswego in the semester prior to which commencement is to occur in order to qualify for commencement honors.  Senior Honors reflecting high cumulative scholarship cited at commencement, are as follows:

  1. Summa cum laude: students achieving indices of 3.80 or higher
  2. Magna cum laude: students achieving indices of 3.60 to 3.79
  3. Cum laude: students achieving indices of 3.30 to 3.59.

Scholarly Standards

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Assessing Progress Toward the Degree

Based on Financial Aid regulations, the undergraduate degree program must be completed while attempting a maximum of 150% of the total credits required for the degree. Most degree programs at SUNY Oswego require a total of 120 credits; such degree program has to then be completed when attempting a maximum of 180 credits. Attempted credits include credits of all courses the student registers for and either completes (i.e. receives a grade for) or withdraws from. For more information on Financial Aid eligibility please visit the Financial Information section of the catalog.

Deans’ List and President’s List

Full-time degree students completing 12 credit hours of letter grade course work qualify for the Fall and Spring semester Deans’ Lists by earning a semester GPA between 3.30 and 3.79.

Students earning a semester GPA of 3.80 or above are honored by having their names placed on the President’s List.

A student who has fewer than 12 credit hours of grades computed in the grade point average for any semester is not eligible for the President’s List or the Deans’ List honors. The following grades are not computed in the grade point average: S–Satisfactory, U–Unsatisfactory, P–Passing, F–Failure, H–High Honors, I–Incomplete, W, Withdrawn, WN-Withdrawn No Grade, WP – Withdrawn Passing, WF –Withdrawn Failing, IP – In Progress, Z–Instructor did not submit a grade, audited courses and repeated courses where a grade of C- or better was previously earned.

Academic Standing

Academic standing is determined at the end of Fall and Spring semesters. A Student’s academic standing will not change during summer or winter sessions. The determination of the student’s academic standing categories, the heuristics that cause changes in the student’s standing, procedures, and processes followed specifically apply to all students matriculated in degree programs, full-time or part-time.

Successful Semester
Student is deemed to have had a Successful Semester if the student:
  a) has a semester GPA of 2.0 or above AND
  b) has received (A through D-, P, S, H, or IP) in 12 credits for the semester when full-time.

Good Standing
Student:
  a) has an overall GPA of 2.0 or above AND
  b) had a Successful Semester.

Academic Warning
Student is placed on Academic Warning (AW) when all of the following conditions are met:
  a) does not have a Successful Semester
  b) has completed one or more semesters already
  c) has always been in Good Standing prior to this semester
  d) has an overall GPA of 2.0 or above
Consequences: Notification by letter from the Dean’s Office and mandatory re-advisement.

Academic Probation
There are four categories of students who will be on Academic Probation at the conclusion of a semester:

A NEW STUDENT (1st semester of matriculation) who does not have a Successful Semester
Consequences: Student completes a Self-Evaluation Form prior to meeting with Advisor. Student will then develop an Academic Success Plan with Advisor and receives approval by the appropriate Dean.

A CONTINUING STUDENT (matriculated in a previous semester) who was either in Good Standing or on Academic Warning during the semester who now
  a) has an overall GPA below 2.0 OR
  b) has an overall GPA 2.0 or above, but did not have a Successful Semester AND had a previous instance of Academic Warning OR Academic Probation
Consequences: Student completes a Self-Evaluation Form prior to meeting with Advisor. Student will then develop an Academic Success Plan with Advisor and receives approval by the appropriate Dean.

A CONTINUING STUDENT who was already on Academic Probation and meets all of the following conditions:
  a) overall GPA is below 2.0
  b) has Successful Semester
  c) followed the stipulations of Academic Success Plan in that semester
Consequences: Student completes a Self-Evaluation Form prior to meeting with Advisor. Student will then update an Academic Success Plan with Advisor and receives approval by the appropriate Dean.

A CONTINUING STUDENT who was already on Academic Probation and meets all of the following conditions:
  a) overall GPA is 2.0 or above
  b) did not have a Successful Semester
  c) followed the stipulations of Academic Success Plan in that semester
Consequences: Student completes a Self-Evaluation Form prior to meeting with Advisor. Student will then update an Academic Success Plan with Advisor and receives approval by the appropriate Dean.

Academic Disqualification

Student who was already on Academic Probation
  a) has an overall GPA below 2.0 AND did not have a Successful Semester (Adherence to the Academic Success Plan is not applicable here) OR
  b) has an overall GPA below 2.0 AND has a Successful Semester AND did NOT follow the stipulations of Academic Success Plan OR
  c) has an overall GPA above 2.0 AND did not have a Successful Semester AND   did NOT follow the stipulations of Academic Success Plan
Consequences: Student may appeal. If denied, student must repair GPA elsewhere for a minimum of one semester taking a minimum of 12 credits at an accredited institution, achieving a minimum GPA of 2.5 there.
Note that repairing GPA will require repeating and passing courses that the student received D+ or lower grade in at Oswego so that they are no longer calculated into the student’s GPA.

Previously Disqualified Students

A written appeal process is possible for previously disqualified students. Materials must be requested from the appropriate Dean’s Office and the appeal filed by June 1 for Fall semester consideration or by December 1st for Spring semester consideration.

Reinstatement subsequent to disqualification is never automatic and the enrollment situation in specific majors and for the College in general may be factors in reinstatement decisions. A decision to reinstate a student will be conveyed in writing and will include the conditions under which the student is allowed to return to the College for a specific semester.

Students Reinstated after Disqualification

Student reenters into Academic Probation status upon reinstatement which will require an Academic Success Plan. Note that a different status may be assigned by the Associate Dean of the unit (School or College) that the student is returning to, depending on the nature and success of coursework taken while away from campus.

Grading and Achievement

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Grading System

Letter grades assigned by instructors are used to indicate the quality of student achievement. The use of plus (+) and minus (-) grades is optional with the instructor.

Grade Explanation
A, A- Outstanding
B+, B, B- Above Average
C+, C, C- Average
D+, D, D- Below Average
E Failure
H High Honors
S Satisfactory
U Unsatisfactory
P Passing
F Failure
I Incomplete
IP In Progress
NG No Grade Transcripted this Semester
WP Withdraw Passing
WF Withdraw Failing
WN Withdraw without Grade
Z Instructor did not submit grade
AU Audit
* Classes not for credit

Grades of S or U are used for evaluating student teaching. Internships and co-ops are graded H, S or U. Achievement in courses taken under the Pass-Fail option is indicated by P or F. A mark of IP (in process or progress) may be submitted by an instructor for students enrolled in thesis courses, research projects, and for courses in which a form of evaluation from off-campus is missing (e.g. GST courses, field placements or departmental internships). A mark of IP may be carried on a student’s transcript for a maximum of 4 semesters (without requesting extensions). At the end of the fourth semester, a grade must be submitted, or the IP automatically becomes an E grade. A mark of I is submitted by an instructor only if a student is unable to complete course requirements for reasons beyond the student’s control. If the course requirements are not completed by the end of the  sixth week of the following semester, an Incomplete will automatically become an E. A mark of Z means an instructor did not submit a grade. Students should immediately contact the instructor for further instructions.

Students expelled or suspended as a result of disciplinary actions will have an NG notation in the place of a grade on every course for which they are registered at the time of the expulsion or suspension, and the credits will count in the total attempted credits. The NG notation will become a permanent part of the students’ academic records (transcripts). Students with NG grades need to apply for readmission and have the dean of students’ approval before they can register again at Oswego. If the student is readmitted to the College, the courses with NG can be repeated; the NG notation, however, will remain part of the student’s academic history. For more information, review the full Transcript Notation Policy.

The grade of W is used when a student petitions to withdraw from a course after the last day to drop a course. See the headings Course Withdrawal Policy and Late Course Withdrawal Policy in this section of the Catalog.

Quality Point System (or Grade Point Average)

Academic standing is based on the cumulative quality point index or grade point average (GPA), and it is determined by assigning a numerical value for each letter grade earned according to the following table:

Letter Grade Quality Points for
Each Credit Hour
A 4.0
A- 3.67
B+ 3.33
B 3.0
B- 2.67
C+ 2.33
C 2.0
C- 1.67
D+ 1.33
D 1.0
D- 0.67
E 0

No other grades carry quality point value.

The quality point index for one semester is determined by dividing the number of quality points earned during the semester by the number of credit hours carried during the semester for all courses in which weighted grades were received. The following example illustrates how the quality point index is determined for one semester.

Course Credit Hrs
Carried
Credit Hrs
Earned
Grade Quality Points
ART 100 3 3 B+ 9.99
ENG 102 3 3 C- 5.01
MAT 120 3 3 C 6.00
BIO 101 4 4 A 16.00
HIS 100      3           3      B   9.00  
  16 16   46.00

 

             
GPA  =     Quality Points Earned     =   46.00    = 2.87
Credit Hours Carried 16
             

In the foregoing illustration 46.00 quality points divided by 16 credit hours attempted yields a semester index of 2.875. The GPA of record is 2.87, as GPA is never rounded.

The cumulative quality point index is determined by dividing the total number of quality points earned by the total number of credit hours carried for all courses in which weighted grades were received.

 

     
Cumulative GPA  =        Total Quality Points Earned    
 Total Credit Hours Carried
     

The following grades are not computed in the grade point average: AU–Audit, S–Satisfactory, U–Unsatisfactory, P–Passing, F–Failure, H–High Honors, I–Incomplete, IP-In Progress, W–Withdrawal and Z–Instructor did not submit a grade.

Students admitted to pursue a second undergraduate degree begin with a new (0.00) GPA.

Completion of Incomplete Grades

Incomplete grades become E grades automatically if the incomplete grade is not completed by the end of the sixth week of the following semester. This is true whether or not the student is in attendance at the College. Exceptions apply only under the following circumstances:

  1. When a faculty member requests an extension because the nature of the course does not allow for the removal of the “I” grade in only one semester (e.g. thesis courses, research projects).
  2. When the student requests an extension with the approval of the pertinent faculty member for (a) a prolonged illness that can be documented with medical records or (b) absence due to active military service.

Under any of the above mentioned circumstances, the request for an extension must be submitted by the faculty member prior to the “sixth week of the following semester” deadline.

Repeating D or E grade Courses

Students may elect to repeat a course in which a grade of D (D+, D, D-) was earned. In certain majors, however, D grades are not acceptable. For specific information concerning each major, consult the program requirements for that major in this Catalog.

Courses in which a D grade was earned may be repeated. However, credit hours are earned only once for the same course. Courses for which an E grade was received must be repeated if they are required for the student’s degree program, minor program, or if they must be repeated as part of a student’s mandatory re advisement or condition of reinstatement following disqualification. Other E grade courses may be repeated at the option of the student.

Transcript notations for repeated D and E grades are as follows. When the course is repeated at Oswego by a student who is in good standing, credit hours, letter grade and quality points earned will be used in computing a new cumulative average. The previous D or E grade will remain on the transcript; however, the transcript will be annotated to indicate that the course has been repeated. When the course is repeated at any other college or university, only credit hours are transferred. The student’s GPA will not reflect the repeated course grade, although the student’s transcript is annotated to indicate that the course has been repeated and the effect of the earlier D or E grade is removed from the GPA.

Students must obtain approval to take course work off-campus. See the heading Approval for Off-Campus Study in the CURRICULUM INFORMATION section of this Catalog for additional information.

Repeating C Grade Courses

Courses in which grades of C- (C+, C, C-) or better were earned cannot be repeated. Should a student repeat such a course in violation of this policy, then (1) the original grade will not be altered in any form, (2) the new grade will not be used to recompute the semester or cumulative GPA, and (3) no additional credit hours will be added to the student’s total.

Repeating Transfer Courses

Students shall only receive credit for the same course once. When a course is taken at Oswego that was taken previously, the grade earned at Oswego is counted towards the GPA.

Transfer Credit: D Grades

Credits from courses in which a grade of “D” was earned transfer directly to Oswego undergraduate programs. Students in some programs, however, must earn at least a C- in those courses transferred to meet a core, cognate or major elective requirement. Transfer students should review program requirements carefully to comply with departmental policies on D grades. Thus, if a D grade was previously earned, the course may have to be repeated to satisfy program requirements. At the graduate level only grades of A or B are transferable.

Grade Appeal

The instructor of record has the responsibility to assign/change the final grade for the course. The purpose of the appeal process is to ensure that college policies have been followed and that the treatment of a student has been fair and consistent with guidelines established in the course syllabus.

The first step in the resolution of any dispute between a student and an instructor concerning an academic matter should be that the student meets with, or makes a determined effort to meet with, the instructor in order to discuss the problem.  Most often, the dispute can be resolved through such discussion between faculty and student; should it not lead to a satisfactory resolution, the student may further pursue an appeal process.

The following describes the steps and deadlines for such an appeal process:

  1. This process begins with a written appeal letter to the chair of the department offering the course. The written appeal must be submitted no later than the end of the sixth week of the following semester. The student is encouraged to seek a mentor, their advisor or any other member of the faculty and staff, to assist in the appeal process.
  2. Within a week of the receipt of the student’s written appeal, an acknowledgment will be sent to the student by the chair. The department chair will need time to look into the issue(s) raised by the student. The chair’s evaluation may involve review of course records, communications between the faculty and the student, or any other document offered by the student or the faculty member deemed pertinent to the case. The discovery process may also require face to face meetings, phone conversations, or email communications between the chair and the student.
  3. The student should expect a written response to the appeal within two weeks of submitting the appeal unless circumstances delay the conclusion of the case.  If the appeal is denied, the written response by the chair must outline the reasons.
  4. If the student is not satisfied with the outcome of the review from the department chair, he or she may then appeal to the appropriate academic dean. This is where the role of a mentor becomes most critical as the student’s appeal to the dean must appropriately offer responses to the written reasons of denial of the appeal by the department chair.  The process described in step 2 applies, except that the student will have two weeks to submit a written appeal to the dean. There would be the same set of expectations regarding acknowledgment of receipt of the appeal letter and deadlines to review and respond to the student by the dean.
  5. Written response from the dean concludes the grade appeal process.

In the event that the faculty member who had assigned the final grade is not available to consider the student’s appeal, the chair of the department responsible for offering the course shall assign a qualified faculty member to review the merits of the appeal in place of that original instructor. This faculty member assigned to review the case will have the authority to change the grade. This exception is only exercised in extraordinary cases where the faculty member, for example, is no longer working for SUNY Oswego and is not responding to the student’s appeal or queries from the department chair or the dean as they review the case.

Final Exam/Last Exam Policy

All courses will involve some form of comprehensive evaluation; final examinations are an integral part of this procedure in many cases. For every course requiring a final examination, the day and hour scheduled for this purpose must be used, and the examination must be limited to that specified period of time. All evening courses in which final examinations are to be given will hold the examination during final exam week at the day and hour of the regular class meeting.

The last examination of the semester in a course must be given during the final exam week at the scheduled time. During the last week of class, examinations may only be given if there is also a comprehensive examination given during the scheduled final examination period.

Pass-Fail Policy

The primary purpose of the Pass-Fail option is to afford juniors and seniors an opportunity to explore course work in areas outside of their regular degree requirements without the direct application of the normal letter grade scale to their grade point average. A course selected under the provisions of the Pass-Fail option, as outlined below, is assigned a grade of Pass (P) if the student earns a final grade of D- or above. The student is assigned a Fail (F) if the student earns an E for the course.

A Pass-Fail Option Form may be printed from the Registrar’s Office web page found at www.oswego.edu/registrar or obtained from the Registrar’s Office or the appropriate Deans’ Office.

  1. Only juniors and seniors (full-time or part-time) and non-degree students are eligible to elect the Pass-Fail option. Pass-Fail credit for non-degree students counts as general elective credit toward a degree program, if the student ultimately matriculates.
  2. Students may request the Pass-Fail option for no more than one course in any marking period, which includes any regular semester, or Summer Session. Students may take a maximum of four (4) courses (or 12 credit hours) on a Pass-Fail basis during their entire degree program.
  3. Excluded as Pass-Fail option courses are those in the following categories:
    1. courses in the student’s academic major or concentration,
    2. professional education courses,
    3. courses used to satisfy general education requirements in specific areas,
    4. courses used to satisfy cognate requirements,
    5. courses in the student’s academic minor.
  4. A student must have at least a 2.0 cumulative grade point average to apply for a Pass-Fail option.
  5. In terms of the provisions of the College Scholarship Standards, a Pass-Fail course is considered to be “completed course work.” A grade of Pass (P) constitutes “satisfactorily completed course work” as defined by the College Scholarship Standards.
  6. A student may file a Pass-Fail option under advisement at final registration or during the official add period. No Pass-Fail option request for semester (or quarter) courses are considered after the add deadline for semester (or quarter) courses.
  7. The instructor of the course is not informed that the student has filed a Pass-Fail option for the course. When the instructor submits a letter grade for the student, the registrar will convert it to a Pass (P) or Fail (F) grade.
  8. A student who has fewer than 12 credit hours of grades computed in the grade point average for any semester is not eligible for the President’s List or the Dean’s List honors. A Pass-Fail course is not computed in the grade point average.
  9. Because the Pass-Fail option is voluntarily elected by the student, it will not be removed in response to a subsequent student request.

Auditing of Courses

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General Policy

A person is permitted to audit courses without credit if the instructor of the course determines that the person has an acceptable reason for auditing, that the person has sufficient academic background to benefit from the course, and that there is room in the class. The extent of an auditor’s participation in class is determined by the instructor. A Permission to Audit Form, available in the Office of the Registrar, signed by the instructor, should be submitted to the Office of the Registrar during the ADD Period. Audited courses will transcript with a grade of “AU” which does not accumulate credits nor compute in the grade point average.

Senior Citizens

Recognizing the commitment of the College to the senior citizens in this geographic area, the College has established the following guidelines for senior citizens who desire to audit any credit course given on or off the College campus. For purposes of this policy, a senior citizen is defined as a person 60 years of age or older.

A senior citizen is permitted to audit courses without credit if the instructor of the course determines that the person has an acceptable reason for auditing, that the person has sufficient academic background to benefit from the course, and that there is room in the class.  The extent of an auditor’s participation in class is determined by the instructor.  A Permission to Audit Form, available in the Office of the Registrar, signed by the instructor, should be submitted to the Office of the Registrar during the ADD Period.  Audited courses will transcript with a grade of “AU” which does not accumulate credits nor compute in the grade point average. It is also understood that the audit privileges will not regularly be extended in all studio and laboratory courses.

There is no fee or any charge levied by the College for the audit privilege. Text books or other related materials may be purchased at the prevailing student price.

Noncredit courses may not be audited as they are not state supported. Senior citizens may, of course, register for such courses upon payment of the regular fees.

Dropping, Adding, Withdrawal and Readmission Policies

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Add Policy

Semester Courses—Semester courses may be added between the first day of instruction and the end of the eighth day of instruction. Courses may be added using the myOswego registration system (oswego.edu/myoswego). The exceptions are those courses which are controlled by the instructor or department. These courses require an ADD Form, signed by the instructor or department as appropriate, submitted to the Registrar’s Office by the end of the eighth day of instruction.

Quarter Courses—Quarter courses may be added between the first day of instruction and the end of the fourth day of instruction. Courses may be added using the myOswego (oswego.edu/myoswego) registration system. The exceptions are those courses which are controlled by the instructor or department. These courses require an ADD Form, signed by the instructor or department as appropriate, submitted to the Registrar’s Office by the end of the fourth day of instruction.

Drop Policy

Semester Courses—Students may voluntarily drop semester courses between the first day of instruction and the end of the fifteenth day of instruction. To drop a course the student may use the myOswego registration system (oswego.edu/myoswego). Courses dropped using these procedures will not appear on the student’s transcript. It is the responsibility of students to drop those courses they no longer are attending.

Quarter Courses—Students may voluntarily drop quarter courses between the first day of instruction and the end of the eighth day of instruction. To drop a course the student may use the myOswego registration system (oswego.edu/myoswego). Courses dropped using these procedures will not appear on the student’s transcript. It is the responsibility of students to drop those courses they no longer are attending.

Drops at Instructor Discretion

Students who have two unexcused absences during the first two class meetings of the semester may be dropped from the course at the discretion of the instructor. The instructor or the department offering the course will notify the Registrar of this action which terminates a student’s registration in that course. However, students should not assume that they have been dropped from a class just because the first two classes were missed. It is ultimately the responsibility of students to drop a course that they are not planning to attend by the deadline published in the Official College Calendar. Failure to do this may result in a failing grade for the course.

Late Add Policy

After the date specified as the last day to add either quarter (four instructional days) or semester courses (eight instructional days), a student may add a course only if given permission by the course instructor and the dean of the college or school of the students major. The student will be required to pay a processing fee for filing a record of this transaction after the deadline to add courses.

Course Withdrawal Policy

A student may withdraw from a course in either the fall semester or the spring semester, after the end of the fifteenth day of instruction through the end of the last class day of the ninth week (excluding Spring Break). The student must complete a Course Withdrawal Form, which must be signed by the course instructor and have the signature of the dean of the school or college of the student’s major. Once the request is approved by the dean, the student must submit the completed form to the Registrar’s Office by the published withdrawal date. Appropriate fee(s) will be assessed.

A grade of W will be assigned when a student withdraws from a course. This grade is not used to calculate a GPA. The hours are counted as hours for which the student was enrolled that semester, but no credit is earned for the course.

Documented Late Course Withdrawal Policy

If a student believes that his or her circumstances are extraordinary (poor performance in a course is not an extraordinary circumstance), a student may petition for late withdrawal from a course after the end of the last class day of the ninth week (excluding Spring Break) in either the fall semester or the spring semester through the last day of classes/instruction for the respective semester. In order for a documented late course withdrawal to be approved, the student must provide documentation of extenuating circumstances beyond the student’s control, and these circumstances must have occurred after the end of the last class day of the ninth week in either the fall semester or the spring semester (excluding Spring Break) through the last day of classes/instruction for the respective semester. Examples of acceptable extenuating circumstances are a change of employment hours that make class attendance impossible, a major illness or death in the immediate family, or the student’s own major illness or injury.

The instructor of the course must indicate approval or disapproval of the late course withdrawal by signing the Late Course Withdrawal Form. Additionally, the documentation (a health care provider’s verification of student illness [physical or psychological] or of major illness of immediate family member; copy of obituary, listing relationship of deceased to student, letter from student’s employer) of the alleged extenuating circumstances must be received by the dean of the school or college of the student’s major at the time of submission of form. The appropriate dean has final authority to approve or disapprove documented late course withdrawal(s). Appropriate fee(s) will be assessed.

A grade of W will be assigned when a student withdraws from a course. This grade is not used to calculate a GPA. The hours are counted as hours for which the student was enrolled that semester, but no credit is earned for the course.

Withdrawal from College

Withdrawal before a semester begins:

A student who has advance registered but no longer intends to attend the College must email the Registrar’s (registrar@oswego.edu) using their SUNY Oswego email account in order to cancel their registration for the term.

Withdrawal during the semester (Fall/Spring):

Matriculated (degree-seeking) Continuing Undergraduates need to contact the The Dean of Students (315-312-5483) and make appropriate arrangements for a College Withdrawal. The deadline for doing this without having to document extenuating circumstances is the same as the Course Withdrawal Period listed on the College Calendar. Withdrawal after the drop period will show on your transcript with a W grade.

If the college withdrawal is confirmed during the semester drop period (1st three weeks of the semester), the courses will be removed from the transcript.

If the college withdrawal is confirmed during the semester course withdrawal period, W grades will be assigned to all of the student’s courses. W grades have no impact on the student’s semester or cumulative grade point average.

If the college withdrawal is confirmed during the semester Documented Late Course Withdrawal period, documentation of an extenuating circumstance, beyond the student’s control, must be provided to the Dean of Student’s office. If approved, W grades will be assigned. If not approved, the student will earn grades for the semester.

The deadline to request a College Withdrawal for a particular semester is the last day of classes for that semester.

Graduate students and non-degree Undergraduates can use the course drop/withdrawal process to drop all of their courses.
The financial implications of a college withdrawal can be significant.  The student will be directed to appropriate offices to determine the impact of the college withdrawal on financial aid and financial obligations to the College.

Medical Leave of Absence

A matriculated student who withdraws from the College for medical reasons may apply for a Medical Leave of Absence.  A Medical Leave for physical or psychological health reasons is intended to allow a student sufficient time away from campus for a sustained recovery and/or stability, and for activities that contribute to a successful return.

Upon the recommendation of Oswego’s Health Services, Counseling Services, or a student’s physician or therapist, the Dean of Students may grant a student Medical Leave status. Depending on the date of the withdrawal, a medical leave may provide a benefit to the student in terms of W grades and financial liability.

Process for Requesting Medical Leave

Students who wish to leave campus on a Medical Leave must also complete the College Withdrawal process. Documentation from a licensed medical or psychological expert is required, that indicates how the student’s personal health is impacting their ability to complete the current semester.

The deadline to request Medical Leave for a particular semester is the last day of classes for that semester.

Return to Campus from Medical Leave

Requests for return from medical leave require a letter from the student along with a letter from the student’s clinician(s) documenting the student’s treatment and readiness to return. These materials must be received by the Dean of Students’ office at least 30 days prior to the start of the semester in which the student expects to return.

The Dean of Students must approve the student’s return. Once a student is cleared to return from a medical leave, their previous academic standing will apply.

Military Leave of Absence

A matriculated student who is called up to active duty with the military or deployed for military action is eligible for a Military Leave of Absence.  A Military Leave of Absence will facilitate a student’s return to Oswego if the student wishes to return within one year from the date of discharge from active service or return from deployment.

Students who wish to utilize the Military Leave must complete the College Withdrawal process. A copy of the student’s military orders will be the documentation needed to expedite the withdrawal.

To return to Oswego, a student on Military Leave of Absence must notify the Registrar’s Office of his or her intent to return to Oswego.  A student on Military Leave of Absence may participate in the Advance Registration period only after he or she has notified the Registrar’s Office.  Documentation of discharge or reassignment will be required.

If the Military Leave of Absence expires, a student must follow the procedures for readmission to the College.

Summer Session Deadlines

Add and drop deadlines for the Summer Session are determined on the basis of the length of the specified course. These deadlines are published on the Division of Extended Learning webpage.

Readmission Policies

General—Students seeking readmission to the College must apply by completing the online Application for Readmission form found at www.oswego.edu/registrar/readmission-process.

Students must submit official transcripts reflecting subsequent enrollment at other institutions since leaving Oswego to:

registrar@oswego.edu or

SUNY Oswego
Registrar’s Office
301 Culkin Hall
Oswego NY 13126

If not already on file, students may also need to submit additional postsecondary transcripts to ensure a complete and accurate accounting of their higher education coursework. Courses will be evaluated in accordance with the Policy for Evaluation of Transfer Credits.

Forgiveness Policy—At the discretion of the appropriate academic dean, this policy may be applied to disqualified students who are seeking readmission to Oswego after two or more years of absence and who cannot reenter Oswego voluntarily because of their previous academic record.

A student who has disqualified and wants to return to the College after a separation of at least two calendar years must appeal for reinstatement. After the review process is complete, the student may be given “permission to register” for up to fifteen hours of three or four credit-hour courses.1

At the end of that initial semester of study (or upon the completion of twelve hours of part-time work), a student who has earned at least a 2.00 average for those approved courses must immediately:

  1. Request consideration for reinstatement through the regular academic appeals process, or
  2. Request reinstatement and “academic forgiveness” for the Oswego work completed prior to disqualification. If the student chooses the “forgiveness” option, the following regulations apply:
    1. All grades earned at Oswego remain a part of the transcript. However, as a result of being granted forgiveness, a student receives credit hours toward the total degree requirement for only those courses taken prior to the student’s two year absence from SUNY Oswego in which the student earned a grade of “C” or better. No courses taken before the student disqualification will be averaged in. Forgiveness of the earlier cumulative GPA allows the student the opportunity to pursue a degree without facing continuous disqualification.
    2. For purposes of determining academic status (good standing/warning/disqualification/graduation), a second (recomputed) cumulative average is determined beginning with the course work completed after the minimum two-year absence.
    3. In order to earn honors, the student must have completed 45 hours between the readmission to Oswego and the semester before graduation.
    4. Consultation with the Dean (or the Dean’s designee) in the College or School in which the student is majoring, is required. The Dean will notify the Registrar that approval of the “forgiveness” option has been granted.
    5. The “forgiveness” option is extended only once during the student’s enrollment at Oswego.

1 Interpretive Note: Students who experienced academic difficulties in the past are urged to think in terms of twelve or thirteen credit hours during the initial semester’s work. A decision to take fifteen hours should be thoroughly reviewed with the advisor and appropriate dean.

Prerequisite/Co-requisite Policy

Definitions of Terms

Prerequisite — a course or other requirement that a student must have taken prior to enrolling in a specific course or program.

Co-requisite — a course or other requirement that a student must take at the same time as another course or requirement.

Advisement Recommendation— a condition of enrollment that a student is advised, but not required, to meet before enrolling in a course or program.

Prerequisite/Co-requisite Challenge Policy

In cases where the student does not meet a stated prerequisite or co requisite of a course and there is no “or permission of instructor” qualifier in such listing, the student may submit a Prerequisite Deviation Form to the home department of the course to seek approval for registering for it.

A Prerequisite Deviation Form in such cases may require additional written documentation, explanation of alternative coursework, background, or abilities which adequately prepare the student for the course.

Context and Rationale

A department may change the prerequisite or co requisite identified for a course to “Advisement Recommendation” or add an “or Permission of Instructor” to its listing.

“Advisement Recommendation” by definition is advisory and requires no challenge process.
For courses that have the “or Permission of Instructor” in their prerequisite or co requisite listing, the instructor’s decision shall be final. In such cases, the department has left the decision for approving an “Add” to the instructor of the course.

The Challenge Policy only applies when an explicit prerequisite or co requisite is identified for a course.
Documenting the acceptance of a challenge is important for the student and the institution. Whether the faculty member teaching the course or the department chair or a designee considers the challenge should be a departmental decision.

Class Attendance

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General

Regular class attendance is obligatory. Faculty may consider attendance when determining grades, subject to the policies below.

Absence from Class

Religious Beliefs

The following statement regarding absence from class because of a student’s religious beliefs is taken from State Education Law, paragraph 224a.

  1. No person shall be expelled from or be refused admission as a student to an institution of higher education for the reason that he is unable, because of his religious beliefs, to attend classes or to participate in any examination, study or work requirements on a particular day or days.
  2. Any student in an institution of higher education who is unable, because of his religious beliefs, to attend classes on a particular day or days shall, because of such absence on the particular day or days, be excused from any examination or any study or work requirements.
  3. It shall be the responsibility of the faculty and of the administrative officials of each institution of higher education to make available to each student who is absent from school, because of his religious beliefs, an equivalent opportunity to make up any examination, study or work requirements which he may have missed because of such absence on any particular day or days. No fees of any kind shall be charged by the institution for making available to the said student such equivalent opportunity.
  4. If classes, examinations, study or work requirements are held on Friday after four o’clock post meridian or on Saturday, similar or makeup classes, examinations, study or work requirements shall be made available on other days, where it is possible and practicable to do so. No special fees shall be charged to the student for these classes, examinations, study or work requirements held on other days.
  5. In effectuating the provisions of this section, it shall be the duty of the faculty and of the administrative officials of each institution of higher education to exercise the fullest measure of good faith. No adverse or prejudicial effects shall result to any student because of his availing himself of the provisions of this section.
  6. Any student, who is aggrieved by the alleged failure of any faculty or administrative officials to comply in good faith with the provisions of this section, shall be entitled to maintain an action or proceeding in the supreme court of the county in which such institution of higher education is located for the enforcement of his rights under this section.
  7. As used in this section, the term “institution of higher education” shall mean schools under the control of the board of trustees of the State University of New York or of the board of higher education of the City of New York or any community college.

Students who feel that this policy has not been fairly implemented may appeal to the appropriate department office or appropriate dean.

Absence from class due to military obligations.

  1. For the purposes of this policy, military obligations are defined as duties that will cause a student to miss no more than 15% of class meetings. These obligations include drill, temporary duty assignment, unit training assemblies, and ROTC training.
  2. For a student, who because of her/his military obligation is unable to attend classes on a particular day or days because of such, that absence is excused.
  3. Faculty and administrative officials of the institution must provide each student who is absent from school because of such obligations an equal opportunity to make up any course requirements which the student may have missed because of such absence. No fees of any kind shall be charged by the institution for this opportunity. At the same time, the absent student shall not expect the instructor to repeat an entire lecture or lab session.
  4. For obligations exceeding this 15% limit, any accommodation will be at the instructor’s discretion.
  5. Students who are actively participating in the United States Military Reserve, ROTC or National Guard are to provide each faculty member and the Dean of Students Office a copy of their military obligation schedule during the first week of class each semester. In the event that the student must perform duties outside of this schedule, a signed memorandum from his/her Unit Commander must be provided with said dates of service and supplied to each instructor.
  6. It is the responsibility of the student who misses any classes under these provisions to contact the instructor of each class (prior to the anticipated absence) to arrange for making up course requirements affected by the provisions. It is also the student’s responsibility to inform the faculty affected by these provisions of changes to their schedules at the time of the change. The Dean of Students Office will work with the student to assist with logistics related to an absence due to military service. 
  7. Faculty and administrative officials of the institution must ensure that students do not suffer unfairly because of these provisions. Students who feel that this policy has not been fairly implemented by faculty may appeal to the appropriate department chair. If it is felt that no satisfaction is received there, then the student may appeal to the appropriate dean.

Class absences beyond two consecutive days

  1. In recognition of the fact that “regular class attendance is obligatory” and that there is no provision for an excused absence from class, students must follow the attendance policy for each class as it is presented in the course syllabus. From time to time, students may find that they will be absent from class for a period of time of three (3) days or more for extenuating circumstances that are beyond their control. When this occurs, students are expected to notify the Dean of Students (315-312-5483) prior to their absence from class. The Dean of Students will then notify faculty members of the absence. This notification is not an excuse nor does it obligate the faculty member in any way. The notification is merely an attempt to facilitate faculty-student contact, particularly in emergency or urgent situations that require the student to be absent.
  2. The Dean of Students will provide out-of-class notification to faculty members only under the following circumstances
    1. Notification is prior to or concurrent with the absence.
    2. Absence is due to circumstances beyond the student’s control (documentation may be requested).
    3. Absence will be for three or more class days.

Athletic Team Membership

  1. A student who because of her/his membership on an officially sanctioned athletic team with officially scheduled competitions is unable to attend classes on a particular day or days shall because of such absence be excused.
  2. Faculty and administrative officials of the institution must provide each student who is absent from school because of such competitions an equal opportunity to make up any course requirements which the student(s) may have missed because of such absence. No fees of any kind shall be charged by the institution for this opportunity. At the same time, the absent student shall not expect the instructor to repeat the entire lecture or laboratory session.
  3. Coaches of each athletic team must provide the student athlete a list with dates of officially scheduled competitions. The student must give this list to faculty and to the administrative officials affected by these provisions at least one class meeting prior to the first competition, and at least one class meeting prior to any post-season competitions. It is the responsibility of the Athletic Director to see that all coaches comply with this provision.
  4. It is the responsibility of the student who misses any classes under these provisions to contact the instructor of each class prior to the anticipated absence to arrange for making up course requirements affected by the provisions. It is also the student’s responsibility to inform the coaches and faculty affected by these provisions of changes to their athletic schedules at the time of the change. It shall be the responsibility of the Academic Advisor for Athletics to monitor student athletes changes of schedules and notification of coaches.
  5. Faculty and administrative officials of the institution must ensure that students do not suffer unfairly because of these provisions. Students who feel that this policy has not been fairly implemented by faculty may appeal to the appropriate department office; if it is felt that no satisfaction is received there, then the student may appeal to the appropriate dean.

Hours of Operation

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Generally administrative and departmental offices operate from 8 AM to 4:30 PM weekdays except for holidays. Some administrative offices remain open on weekends by appointment. Academic buildings generally open by 7 AM and close by 10 PM weekdays except for certain buildings, such as Penfield Library, which have more flexible hours. Some academic buildings are open on weekends. During specific holiday periods and between semesters the residence halls and dining halls are not open. Administrative offices close at 4 PM during the summer.

Specific information is published in the Official College Calendar and all-campus email announcements.

Canceled Classes Due to Weather

To find out if classes are canceled because of inclement weather on the main Oswego campus, members of the college community have several options: check www.oswego.edu, the SUNY Oswego website; call 312-3333, the SUNY Oswego Information Line; listen to radio and television; or, in residence halls, see digital signage notification or check with the front desk.

Members of the college community may receive direct notification as well, if they have signed up to receive college alerts through NY-Alert. Students indicate their preferences through myOswego under personal information. Faculty and staff enter their contact information by logging on to the employee portal on www.suny.edu, the SUNY system website.

Classes will proceed as scheduled unless official announcements of cancellation are made. When classes are canceled, faculty and commuting students are advised not to come to the main Oswego campus.

Among the TV and radio stations making this college’s class cancellation announcements are TV Channels 3, 5, 9 and 10 in Syracuse, the WRVO Stations (FM 89.9 to 91.9 throughout Central Upstate New York); WWTI Newswatch 50 in Watertown; and iHeartMedia radio stations in Syracuse (WSYR AM 570, Y94 FM 94.5, etc.) and Rochester (WHAM 1180, etc.).

The public announcement of class cancellations only occurs when the entire campus of thousands of students and faculty are affected. Faculty members wishing to cancel their own classes should follow the same procedure used when they are ill. Faculty teaching classes at locations other than the main Oswego campus should follow the weather closing policy governing the class site and inform students how to find out if their class is canceled.

The college does not close when classes are canceled. Under the state’s regulations, only the governor has the authority to close a state agency such as SUNY Oswego. Unless the governor closes the college, employees who choose not to come to work or to leave work early are required to charge their time. The only exception is for instructional faculty when classes have been canceled.

Honors Program with Individual Major Programs

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Honors programs have been instituted for outstanding students in the fields of biology, chemistry, economics, history, mathematics, meteorology, physics, political science, and psychology. The eligibility requirements for these programs are rigorous, and the course work itself is beyond the scope of that of regular classes. Those students who meet the requirements are encouraged to apply for that program in their major field by the middle of their fourth semester. Interested students should consult the chairpersons of the respective departments offering honors programs.

Honor Societies

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One of the great academic achievements of any student is the election to an honor society in the student’s major field of interest. Oswego students have the opportunity to gain recognition by the following societies.

Alpha Delta Omega   public justice honor society
Alpha Epsilon Rho   scholastic honor society
Alpha Psi Omega   national dramatics honor society
Alpha Sigma Lambda   honor society for adult learners
Beta Alpha Psi   national business honor society
Beta Beta Beta   national biological honor society
Beta Gamma Sigma   international business honor society for AACSB accredited schools
Chi Alpha Epsilon   educational opportunity program honor society
Chi Sigma Iota   international honor society of professional counseling and professional counselors
Delta Phi Alpha   German honor society
Epsilon Pi Tau   international honor society for education in technology
Epsilon Upsilon   national health honorary society
Eta Sigma Gamma   national health education honorary society
Gamma Kappa Alpha   national Italian honor society
Kappa Delta Pi   national education honor society
Lambda Alpha   anthropology honor society
Lambda Pi Eta   national communication studies honor society
Mu Beta Psi   national honorary musical fraternity
Omicron Delta Epsilon   international academic honor society
Omicron Delta Kappa   national leadership honor society
Phi Alpha Theta   international history honor society
Phi Beta Delta   international honor society
Phi Kappa Phi   national honor society
Pi Delta Phi   French honor society
Pi Kappa Lambda   national music honor society
Pi Sigma Alpha   national political science honor society
Psi Chi   national honor society for psychology
Sigma Delta Pi   national Hispanic honor society
Sigma Iota Rho   an interdisciplinary honor society
specializing in the
interdisciplinary field of Academic Affairs
Sigma Pi Sigma   national physics honor society
Sigma Tau Delta   international English honor society
Sigma Xi   scientific research society
Tau Sigma   academic honor society
Vega   junior and senior women’s honor society

 

Micro Credentials

SUNY Oswego offers three types of micro credentials: Academic Micro Credential, Skill Badge or Competency Badge. A micro credential is a small plan of study that allows students to gain relevant skills that are needed in today’s workforce. Students successfully completing a SUNY Oswego micro credential will be able to demonstrate specific skill competencies to employers and/or related academic disciplines.

Badges

  • The SUNY Oswego Skill Badge is a non-credit-bearing plan of study that documents the attainment of a discrete, assessable skill.
  • The SUNY Oswego Competency Badge is a non-credit-bearing plan of study that documents the attainment of one or more discrete, assessable skills.

Curricular requirements of badges may include credit course(s), but the badge is not credit-bearing. Badges may include non-credit components of one or more courses, or one or more non-credit-bearing experiential learning activities or a combination thereof. All non-credit-bearing micro credentials are approved via division-level governance review processes (academic and/or non-academic). Students completing a non-credit-bearing micro credential will receive access to a digital badge, and may receive notation on the co-curricular transcript.

Academic Micro Credential

  • The SUNY Oswego Academic Micro Credential is an approved undergraduate or graduate level credit-bearing course sequence within a single or interdisciplinary program.

Academic Micro Credentials contain a minimum of 1 and a maximum of 17 credit hours of coursework and require a minimum grade of 2.0 in all credit courses taken for the credential (or department-specified grade, which may higher). Classes that require prerequisite-requisites must be met and transfer credits may be applied to the micro credential following existing standards. Eligibility requirements might include a minimum GPA for matriculated students. Eligibility requirements might include both a minimum GPA and/or an application process for non-matriculated students. Non-credit activity may be required in an Academic Micro Credential which can be evaluated for credit equivalency.

All credit-bearing micro credentials are approved via college-wide curriculum processes. Existing programs may have micro credentials embedded in them, where all classes taken would apply to both micro credential and degree. Students completing Academic Micro Credential will receive a notation on their academic transcript as well as access to a digital badge. Courses previously taken as part of a program may be used toward a micro credential, but must be taken within the preceding 5 years (or less at the discretion of the department).

To earn a SUNY Oswego micro credential, 50% of the courses must be taken from SUNY Oswego. There is no limit to the number of micro credentials a student may earn. 

SUNY Cross Registration

Oswego students seeking to participate in SUNY Cross Registration must follow the Off-Campus Study Approval process. The advantage of SUNY Cross Registration is that it enables aid-eligible matriculated students to combine program eligible credits from two or more campuses into a full-time load for financial aid purposes. This provides students the opportunity to register at more than one SUNY campus without incurring additional tuition charges.

Oswego students may apply for Cross Registration for Fall, Spring and Summer terms only. Applications must be submitted by August 15 for Fall, January 15 for Spring and May 15 for Summer sessions. The sum of Oswego credits and cross-registration credits cannot exceed the student’s maximum registration hours cap for the term as defined by Oswego.

It is the student’s responsibility to ensure that the course is being offered and that the “host” SUNY school (where the off-campus course will be taken) participates in Cross Registration during the term that the off-campus course is offered.

Oswego students who wish to participate in SUNY Cross Registration must:

  • Be enrolled and attending SUNY Oswego in the same term as the requested Off-Campus Study.
  • Have a current Cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher and not be in an academic probationary status.
  • Obtain Approval for Off-Campus Study.
  • Apply for cross-registration and obtain permission in advance of the deadlines noted above.
  • Courses registered for at another SUNY campus prior to receiving official approvals are not covered under the SUNY Cross Registration agreement.

Approval of Cross Registration requires:

  • That the requested course is applicable toward the student’s SUNY Oswego degree program (first major, General Education, Liberal Arts, upper-division requirements or as an all-college elective).
  • The course is not being offered at Oswego at such a time that it results in demonstrable delay in degree completion.

Students participating in SUNY Cross Registration must notify the Oswego Registrar’s Office and the host Campus within five business days if their enrollment status changes – i.e. a drop or withdrawal from the approved off-campus course. These changes may impact financial aid eligibility in the current and/or future terms. Changes in enrollment may result in student liability for tuition and/or fees.

Students are encouraged to consult the Financial Aid Office regarding academic eligibility for financial aid, including satisfactory academic progress standards before making any changes to their schedules.

 

Oswego Academic Integrity Policy

Preamble

At the State University of New York at Oswego (SUNY Oswego, the College), academic integrity on the part of all students, faculty, and staff is essential to individual growth and development, and the overall health of our campus community. When academic dishonesty occurs, it has a negative effect on individual success and devalues the education process and academic environment as a whole. Failure to adhere to the standards of academic integrity affects not just individual students but entire courses and the institution as a whole.

Any form of academic dishonesty is a serious concern, and as such, students who are found to have violated this policy may be subject to penalties including, but not limited to, reductions of assignment grades, failure of courses, notations on official transcripts, and suspension or expulsion from the College.

Statement on Academic Integrity

At SUNY Oswego, we are committed to maintaining rigorous intellectual standards and the highest level of academic integrity. As leaders and role models, faculty and professional staff must adhere to the highest standards of academic integrity in scholarship and professional practice. The College endeavors to foster an environment and culture in which students adhere to these same standards that will extend beyond their time at SUNY Oswego.

Academic integrity at SUNY Oswego is guided by the following three principles:

  1. all members of the College community should be held to the highest standards of academic integrity and personal responsibility;
  2. expectations for academic integrity should be clearly articulated, as should the consequences for violation of these standards; and
  3. all members of the College community are entitled to due process when their academic integrity is called into question.

Definitions of Plagiarism, Fabrication or Falsification, Cheating, and Copyright Violation

Acts of academic dishonesty can take many forms. Examples include, but are not limited to: 

Plagiarism

Plagiarism is the practice of deliberately or inadvertently taking someone else’s work or ideas, in part or in full, and passing them off as one’s own, in text or other mediums. Plagiarism of any kind, including taking from either published or unpublished material, is contrary to established ethical practices. All members of the College are expected to acknowledge the intellectual work of others. In some cases, plagiarism may also involve copyright violations (see Copyright Violation). 

Intentional Plagiarism

Intentional plagiarism is the deliberate act of representing the words, ideas, or data of someone else as your own without providing proper attribution to the author.

Inadvertent Plagiarism

Inadvertent plagiarism involves the non-deliberate use of someone else’s words, ideas, or data without proper attribution. Inadvertent plagiarism usually results from a failure to follow established rules for documenting sources or from simply being careless in research and writing. However, as this is a failure in doing one’s due diligence, academic penalties may be applied even in the case of inadvertent plagiarism.

Self-Plagiarism

Self-plagiarism is a unique type of plagiarism that may not be immediately apparent. Self-plagiarism is when prior portions, or the entirety, of a student’s own previous work is presented as new, original work. This covers the submission of the same work in multiple courses, and the re-submission of previous work in the same class. Unlike intentional and inadvertent plagiarism, this behaviour may be allowable with the permission of the instructor. If a student has permission to reuse work, they should cite the original authors, not their own prior work.

Examples of plagiarism include but are not limited to:

  • copying word-for-word from sources without acknowledgement; 
  • citing work from sources, but doing so incorrectly;
  • restating or rewording of material without acknowledgment (N.B. The purpose of paraphrasing is to enhance clarity. It does not just involve minor shifts in wording, and still requires acknowledgment);
  • blending your own ideas with those from another source without acknowledgment;
  • planning to commit an act of plagiarism; and
  • committing self-plagiarism without permission.

Fabrication or Falsification

Fabrication or falsification is a form of academic dishonesty in which someone invents or distorts the origin or content of information cited.

Examples of fabrication or falsification include but are not limited to:

  • citing a source that does not exist; 
  • misrepresenting having conducted interviews in research or journalism or misrepresenting the content of interviews;
  • attributing ideas and information not included in the source;
  • citing a source as supporting a position it does not support;
  • citing a source that does not appear in the reference list;
  • listing a source in the citations/bibliography section which was not utilized in preparing the work;
  • intentionally distorting the meaning or applicability of data;
  • inventing data or statistical results;
  • feigning an illness or other event to delay an exam or assignment;
  • changing or altering grades or other official educational records, such as adjusting already submitted or graded work, or adjusting community and internship work hours; 
  • misrepresenting identity on an exam, assignment or attendance activity; and
  • planning to commit an act of fabrication or falsification.

Cheating 

Cheating is an attempt to use unfair means to gain an advantage during an examination or on an assignment which gives the appearance of having the knowledge or a skill that an individual has not actually obtained. 

  • Examples of cheating include but are not limited to:
  • copying from another person’s work from an examination or an assignment;
  • allowing someone to copy from an examination or an assignment;
  • using unauthorized materials such as cheat sheets, smartphones, solutions manuals, test bank solutions, etc.;
  • collaborating on an examination or assignment without approval from the instructor;
  • obtaining, purchasing, selling or sharing exams, assignments or answers to assessments;
  • working on an examination or assignment beyond time limits;
  • planning to cheat.

Copyright Violation

Copyright is a form of intellectual property law that protects original works of authorship including, but not limited to: texts, images, photographs, illustrations, sound recordings, dramatic works, music, and video. The copyright holder is guaranteed the exclusive rights to perform, display, reproduce, and distribute the work as well as to make derivative works. Currently, these rights are protected for the life of the author plus 70 years. Copyright violations occur either when one uses media in websites, blog posts, videos, papers, etc. without securing permission (usually in the form of a license) for the specific use or when the use does not fall under the “fair use” clause of copyright law. Many classroom uses of copyrighted materials fall under fair use, but not all (see Penfield Library’s guide to fair use for specific details).

Examples of copyright violation include, but are not limited to:

  • uploading course materials provided by instructors, including assignment sheets and study guides, to websites like Chegg.com and Coursehero.com; 
  • using a photograph made by a professional photographer without the license or permission to do so, even it it is of yourself, and even if it is on your public facing personal website or social media account;
  • including an illustration with a Creative Commons BY license in a presentation without including attribution;
  • staging a public performance without the appropriate permissions including royalties and licenses, etc.
  • sharing copyrighted material (such as videos or music) on a site such as YouTube, Vimeo, or peer-to-peer networks;
  • creating and distributing t-shirts with a meme that you found online without the appropriate permission/license; and
  • downloading a copy of a font installed on a lab computer to use on a personal computer.

Faculty, Student, and Staff Responsibilities

Faculty, students, and staff have a shared responsibility to maintain academic integrity, which includes being knowledgeable of SUNY Oswego’s policy and reporting incidents. Information regarding the prevention of academic dishonesty is available through Penfield Library.  All members of the campus community are required to abide by the Academic Integrity Policies, both as outlined in this document, and in any course specific policies.  It is the responsibility of each student to make a prudent choice when they become aware of a violation. Students are encouraged to report academic dishonesty to the faculty member, their advisor, their associate dean, or to Student Conduct, directly or through the online reporting system.

Instructors are required to include a statement concerning academic integrity in their course syllabus or comparable course information documents, and should provide students with a link to the full policy. Additionally, faculty must note any situations that might be unique to their coursework and are not covered under this policy, and describe how such situations would be handled.

Students are required to familiarize themselves with the policy, and with any additional instructions given by their faculty member.

Potential Penalties for Academic Integrity Violations

Violations of the Academic Integrity Policy can result in substantial penalties. There is, however, an important distinction between academic evaluation (e.g., reduction in grade, additional work) and disciplinary action.

Instructors have the authority to make academic judgments relating to their students’ work, and to make decisions in the interests of furthering their students’ education.

Additionally, the University, acting through its formal processes, may discipline a student. Violations that reach this level require coordination between the faculty member, the Associate Dean, and Student Conduct to ensure students their due process rights.

Levels of Violation

This is a broad framework to assist instructors in determining the severity of a violation of the Policy. Note that which Level a violation falls into may depend on the level of a course. For example, omitting a citation in a 100 level course may only be a Level 0, but doing the same in a graduate level course may be a Level 1 violation.

Level 0 - This represents a minor error that has no, or a minor academic penalty, and is usually considered a learning experience.  A common example of this might include editorial errors such as incomplete quotations and forgetting to properly reference material from a cited source. These should still be reported even if no action is taken so that potential patterns of similar behavior will become apparent.

Level 1 - This represents a substantial violation of the policy, but is still generally an unintentional error, possibly reflecting a more serious misunderstanding of the policy and related requirements. Examples of Level 1 violations might be substantial but unintentional citation errors, or submitting work completed in one course to satisfy an assignment in another course.  This may also be used for repeated Level 0 violations within the same course.

Level 2 - This represents an unintentional, but major violation of the policy, or a violation that was made intentionally. Generally violations at this level will only directly involve one or two students. This may also be used for repeated Level 1 violations within the same course.  Examples of Level 2 incidents might include:

  • feigning illness to avoid an exam
  • giving aid on assessment activities without specific permission to do so, or seeking and receiving such aid
  • two students sharing research on a single topic to complete individual assignments in different courses
  • falsifying attendance (such as signing in for another student who is not present)
  • the use of unauthorized notes or other means of cheating on an assessment
  • the uploading of general course learning materials (such as course slides) to external websites without explicit permission from the instructor.
  • minor plagiarism (one or two short excerpts of improperly cited material), etc.

Level 3 - This represents an egregious violation of the policy that was made intentionally, and/or involved multiple students collaborating to violate the policy. At this level, careful consideration should be given as to whether only an academic penalty is appropriate, or if a case should also be referred to Student Conduct. This may also be used for repeated Level 2 violations within the same course. Examples of Level 3 violations might include:

  • major plagiarism, where the majority or entirety of a work having been copied
  • the uploading of specific course assessment materials (such as assignments or tests, with or without answers) to external websites without explicit permission from the instructor.
  • the purchasing of any materials for submission as your own work (including the purchase of exam keys)
  • the sale of work for others to submit as their own (even if the sale is to students that are not part of SUNY Oswego)
  • identity falsification for the purposes of completing assessments (such as having someone take an exam in one’s place or vice versa)
  • stealing academically related materials (such as stealing a copy of test key from an instructor or stealing another student’s work out of a dropbox for the purpose of copying it or submitting it as the student’s own work)
  • working with one or more other students with the intention of violating this policy (such as multiple students meeting as a group to work on a take home exam without instructor permission to collaborate)
  • altering/forging college documents or records 

Penalties for Violations  

Faculty should refer to the following Rubric in determining an appropriate level of sanction depending on the severity of the violation of the policy. If a faculty member wishes to take action outside of these recommendations, they should provide an explanation for the deviation in their Academic Integrity Violation Incident Report report.

Potential Sanction Level 0 Level 1 Level 2 Level 3
No Academic Penalty X X    
Correction and Resubmission of Assessment X X    
Assignment of Extra Work Related to the Violation X X X  
Reduction of Assessment Grade X X X  
No Credit on Assessment   X X X
Reduction of Final Course Grade by No More Than One Letter Grade     X X
Immediate Reduction of Final Course Grade to 0/Letter Grade E     X X
Referral of Student to Student Conduct       X

Additional Actions Related to Violations

Separately from the Violation Process within a course, whenever a Violation is entered into the University System, a check will be made to see if the student has any previously recorded violations. The Associate Dean of the student’s home school will be notified of any repeated violations and may initiate additional actions, including but potentially not limited to the following:

  1. If the student has no prior violations recorded, a record of the violation is retained by the University. This information will not be shared outside of the University.
  2. If the student has more than one level zero violation, a letter of warning will be issued to the student, including a recommendation to campus resources.
  3. If this is the student’s first violation of the Policy, and the instructor has determined that the penalty will result in a Reduction of Assessment or Course Grade, the violation is reported for record retention and a letter of warning will be issued to the student, including a recommendation to campus resources.
  4. If this is the student’s second violation of the Policy and the instructor has determined that the penalty will result in a Reduction of Assessment or Course Grade, the violation is reported for record retention, and direct interventions to remedy the behavior will be mandated.
  5. If the Associate Dean determines that there is an ongoing pattern of violations, either at a high or low level, a student will be referred to Student Conduct to address the behavior.

Investigating and Resolving Academic Integrity Violations 

Instructor Procedures

An instructor who suspects a student of academic dishonesty should observe the following process:

  1. The instructor should work to gather information and evidence related to the suspected incident. The student does not need to be notified at this stage, but all relevant material should be gathered and maintained until the matter is resolved.
  2. Upon gathering evidence, if the instructor determines that evidence supports that a violation has occurred, they should send a request to meet with the student via Oswego email. The meeting should be prompt, private, and informal. If at all possible, this meeting should be held synchronously (in person or virtual) or via phone conference. The student must be given the opportunity to explain the incident from their perspective prior to a penalty being imposed. Regardless of the means of communication, there is an understanding that the privacy of both parties will be maintained. During these communications, the student and instructor may each choose to have a witness present for the discussion.
    The instructor is obligated to make a reasonable effort to allow for a student explanation, but if a student is unresponsive to attempts at communication or otherwise is unable or unwilling to provide an explanation, the instructor should proceed to Step 4, and should detail what attempts to contact the student were made.
  3. An instructor should evaluate all information obtained, including information shared during the student meeting, against relevant elements of both the academic Integrity Policy and the Course Syllabus to determine if a violation has occurred. If a violation is substantiated, instructors should refer to the Levels of Violation and Penalties for Violations sections of this policy for guidelines on assigning appropriate penalties.
  4. Instructors must complete the Academic Integrity Violation Incident Report, which will record as much information about the violation as possible, and the preferred academic penalty.
  5. The Academic Integrity Violation Incident Report will be sent to the relevant Department Chair or a person designated by the relevant Associate Dean. A) In the case of a Level 0 to Level 2 Violations that does not result in an Academic Penalty of Immediate Reduction of Final Course Grade to E, the Chair/Designee will review and approve the action.  The Chair/Designee may request to review the incident and penalty with the faculty member prior to approval. B) When a Level 3 Violation is reported, or when a Level 2 Violation results in an Academic Penalty of Immediate Reduction of Final Course Grade to E, the case is automatically elevated to Student Conduct and the Associate Dean for evaluation. The instructor should pause the academic penalty process to coordinate further actions with Student Conduct.
  6. For Level 0 to Level 2 Violations that are not elevated, the student will receive written notification detailing the instructor’s findings and the assigned academic penalty.
  7. Students may appeal their academic penalties at the end of a semester using the Grades Appeal Process. Once the time for appeal has expired, or an appeal is undertaken and concluded, the process is considered concluded.

Student Conduct Procedures

  1. When a Level 3 Violation is reported, or when a Level 2 Violation results in an Academic Penalty of Immediate Reduction of Final Course Grade to E, the case is automatically elevated to Student Conduct and the Associate Dean for evaluation on whether additional action should be taken. The instructor should pause the academic penalty process to coordinate further actions with Student Conduct.
  2. Under these conditions, the student is prohibited from withdrawing from the course; a hold is placed on the student’s account until the case is resolved.
  3. Student Conduct will initiate the conduct process with instructor and student participation. Once this process is begun, the following forms of resolution are available for the accused student: A) Resolution Agreement: the accused student accepts responsibility for the violation(s), acknowledges their role or involvement in the incident, and waives any rights to contest the allegations or the sanctions. The instructor and the Director of Conduct are not to revisit the question of whether the alleged policy violations occurred, but will consider appropriate sanctions (academic and non-academic) based on the acceptance of responsibility, the nature and severity of the incident and the charge(s) under consideration. The student will have three days to sign a mutual agreement which immediately resolves the violation and voluntarily waives their appeal rights. B) Adjudication: The accused student denies responsibility and chooses to contest the allegations.  The Director of Conduct will refer the case to the appropriate forum of resolution based on the severity of the violation.  The accused student is assumed to be not-responsible concerning the charges which have been leveled against them, and the University bears responsibility to provide convincing evidence. The student is permitted to attend classes and have further work graded until resolution of the matter is final. i) Administrative Conference: The student, instructor, and the Director of Student Conduct convene and discuss the circumstances surrounding the incident; sanctions from this conference will not rise above disciplinary probation and the student receives an XE grade on their transcript. If the student disagrees with the academic penalty, they may request an appeal through the grades appeal policy, potentially on an accelerated timeline. ii) Hearing: If the nature of the violation could likely result in the suspension or expulsion of the student, a hearing board will convene with the participation of the student and instructor, to determine a final resolution.  If the outcome involves suspension or expulsion, the student may request an appeal through the University’s Conduct Process.

Time Limitations on Pursuing Violations

Upon the discovery of a suspected academic integrity violation, an instructor should take action as soon as possible. There is no official time limit for the discovery of, or penalties related to, an academic integrity violation. However, an instructor should consult the appropriate Associate Dean in the case that the discovery of a suspected violation happens after grades have been submitted and released to the student.

Notations on Student Academic Transcript

XE - A student that has received the academic penalty of Reduction of Final Course Grade to 0/Letter Grade E may have an XE place on their transcript for the relevant course grade. This indicates that the failing grade was given due to an Academic Integrity Violation.

The XE designation may only be applied by Student Conduct.  If a faculty does not engage with Student Conduct after deciding to give an Immediate Reduction of Final Course Grade to E, the student transcript will only show an E.

Petition for Forgiveness - A student may petition for removal of ‘XE’ on the transcript after two academic semesters of acceptable performance and no further behavioral or academic infractions. Forgiveness will not be considered earlier than one year after the date of adjudication through the conduct process. Expulsion for academic dishonesty will be permanently noted on the student’s transcript.

NR - If the incident occurs and cannot be resolved before grades have to be submitted, a student will be given an NR in the course as a temporary, neutral grade.

Course Withdrawal Policy

Students who are found responsible for a violation of the Academic Integrity Policy and are facing the potential of a failing grade in the course will not be permitted to withdraw from the course in which the violation occurred; a hold is placed on the student’s account until the case is resolved.

Student Appeal Process

All students have the right to appeal if a faculty member assigns an academic penalty the student believes is undeserved by using the Oswego Grade Appeals Process. No additional action will be taken against a student that pursues an appeal:

  1. If the academic penalty does not result in the Immediate Reduction of the Final Course Grade to 0/Letter Grade E, a student may appeal after the final course grade is assigned at the end of the semester.
  2. If the Immediate Reduction of the Final Course Grade to 0/Letter Grade E penalty is imposed students may begin the Oswego Grade Appeals Process upon receiving notification of the assigned penalty from the University.

If a student chooses to exercise their right to appeal, the Instructor will be notified and the student will be able to attend class and have work graded until the appeals process is concluded.

If a student is referred to Student Conduct in addition to any academic actions, and the outcome involves suspension or expulsion, the student may request an appeal through the University’s Conduct Process.