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    State University of New York at Oswego
   
 
  Jul 23, 2017
 
 
    
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2013-2014 Undergraduate Catalog [Archived Catalog]

College Standards and Policies


Registrar’s Office
307 Culkin Hall
315-312-2235
registra@oswego.edu
www.oswego.edu/registrar

Graduation

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Policy on Filing for Graduation and Participation in the Graduation Ceremony

Students are advised that filing to graduate is a two-step process; (1) they must first apply to graduate and (2) they must complete a Senior Check Form with each of their declared major(s) and minor(s) advisor(s). Students must file an on-line degree application in order to be considered eligible for graduation. Instructions to File Online: Sign in to myOswego;
Click on the “Student Records” tab; Click on “Apply for Graduation”; Follow instructions on the Graduation Form. Notification is sent to all students with second semester junior standing in both the fall and spring semesters with information regarding how and when to file on-line for graduation. Detailed instructions are available on the Registrar’s Office website. Once a student has filed to graduate, it is the student’s responsibility to meet with his or her advisor(s) for all majors and minors to complete the Senior Check Form. All graduation requirements, as stipulated by the College Catalog, should be reviewed at this time. Both the student and advisor must sign the Senior Check Form. It must be returned to the Registrar’s Graduation Area after it has been reviewed and signed. Completion of the Senior Check Form is mandatory for graduation. An individual graduation audit is completed for each student in order to certify the completion of all degree requirements. If requirements have not been met, the student is notified and his or her name is deleted from the graduation list. It is the student’s responsibility to notify the Registrar’s Office when the student plans to complete the requirements for their degree. Students must file on-line by the following dates in order to guarantee having their names printed in the commencement program:

April 1 for the December Graduation Ceremony
October 1 for the May Graduation Ceremony
February 1 for August graduates

Students who finish coursework during the spring semester must file as May graduates and attend the May ceremony.

Students who will complete degree requirements by the end of the summer must file on-line as August graduates but are eligible to participate in the preceding May ceremony.

Students who finish coursework during the fall semester should file as December graduates and have the choice of attending either the December ceremony or the following May ceremony.

A diploma and an unofficial transcript showing the degree are mailed to the student’s home address several weeks after the graduation ceremony.

Requirements

To be considered eligible for graduation a candidate must meet the following requirements:

  1. Complete all prescribed course work for the degree program with a minimum GPA of 2.00 with the exception of programs in Curriculum and Instruction, Technology, and Vocational Teacher Preparation Departments which require a minimum GPA of 2.50. Calculation of the GPA in the major includes all courses in the defined program of study listed as requirements of the major.
  2. Complete the prescribed number of credit hours of course work for the curriculum in which enrolled with a minimum index of 2.00 with the exception of programs in Curriculum and Instruction, Technology, and Vocational Teacher Preparation Departments which require a minimum GPA of 2.50. Some degree programs require a C- (C minus) grade or better in some or all major requirements. This information is included within each major program requirements.
  3. Complete a minimum of 60 credit hours from an accredited four-year institution, 30 credit hours of which must be earned at Oswego.
  4. Complete a minimum of one-half  of the major requirements at Oswego.
  5. Complete a minimum of 42 credit hours of course work at the 300- or 400-level.
  6. Satisfy all College obligations outstanding at the time of graduation.
  7. File the on-line degree application. The on-line application is found on myOswego under the Student Records tab, click on “Apply for Graduation.” Relevant application dates and deadlines are posted on the Registrar’s Office website.
  8. Complete a Senior Check Form with the student’s academic advisor(s). Senior check forms must be completed for each major and minor declared, and must be returned to the Registrar’s Office by the student’s advisor(s). Senior check forms are due as follows: May 1 for December graduation, December 1 for May graduation, April 1 for August graduation.
  9. For a minor to be noted on transcript at graduation, a student must have a minimum overall 2.0 GPA in all courses credited to the minor. In addition, a minimum of one-half of the minor requirements must be completed at Oswego.

Table II  summarizes the academic requirements for various degrees and majors which all students must meet in order to graduate.

Catalog Curricular Requirements

A student is permitted to graduate under the program of study in effect at the time of admission provided that the student’s attendance at the College is not interrupted by an absence of more than two academic years. If a student’s attendance is interrupted by an absence of more than two academic years, the student will be required to graduate under the program of study in effect at the time of readmission to the College. Approved off-campus study in overseas academic programs, internships, and the visiting student program are considered study in residence.

Senior Honors

All seniors, including transfer students, must have enrolled in a total of at least 45 credit hours in residence by the semester in which commencement is to occur in order to qualify for commencement honors. Senior Honors reflecting high cumulative scholarship cited at commencement, are as follows:

  1. Summa cum laude: students achieving indices of 3.80 or higher
  2. Magna cum laude: students achieving indices of 3.60 to 3.79
  3. Cum laude: students achieving indices of 3.30 to 3.59. 

Scholarly Standards

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Assessing Progress Toward the Degree

The undergraduate degree program of any full-time matriculated student is expected to be completed in eight marking periods. The undergraduate degree program must be completed within a maximum of twelve periods of full-time enrollment. Full-time enrollment is defined as any marking period in which the student registers for twelve or more credit hours.

Students are considered to be in good standing and making satisfactory progress toward the degree if they are permitted to continue enrollment at the College based on the academic guidelines defined below.

Deans’ List and President’s List

Full-time degree students completing 12 credit hours of letter grade course work qualify for the Fall and Spring semester Deans’ Lists by earning a semester index between 3.30 and 3.79.

Students earning a semester index of 3.80 or above are honored by having their names placed on the President’s List.

A student who has fewer than 12 credit hours of grades computed in the grade point average for any semester is not eligible for the President’s List or the Deans’ List honors. The following grades are not computed in the grade point average: S–Satisfactory, U–Unsatisfactory, P–Passing, F–Failure, H–High Honors, I–Incomplete, IP - In-Progress, W–Withdrawal and Z–Instructor did not submit a grade.

Academic Warning Standards for Degree Program Students

Grade reports are marked “Academic Warning” after any marking period in which the student’s (full-time or part-time) marking period GPA is less than 2.0. A student who registers for twelve hours of work in any marking period and is therefore a full-time student, must meet these requirements.

  1. A full-time student must complete (grades of A through E, P, F, H, S, U) 12 hours of coursework in each semester.
  2. A full-time student must earn a passing grade (A through D-, P, S, H) in:
    a. 9 hours of work during each marking period for the initial 60 registered credit hours in the degree program;
    b. 12 hours of work during each marking period after accumulating 61 or more registered credit hours.

In any marking period a student who fails to complete or pass the required hours of work will be placed on Academic Warning.

Academic Disqualification Standards for Degree Program Students

For all matriculated students, the following chart outlines the scholarship standards and review procedure. First semester matriculated students should note that at the end of the first marking period of attendance, they will be disqualified if their semester average is below 1.01. Such individuals will be required to have at least one semester away from the College before appealing for reinstatement consideration.

Grade reports for students are marked “Academic Disqualification” with a mandatory semester off or “Academic Disqualification” subject to review according to the following grade point average guidelines.

Cumulative registered credit hours* Disqualified with cumulative average below
Mandatory semester off before appeal if cumulative average is Subject to internal review** if cumulative average is
1st semester of attendance 1.01 All No review
Through 30 1.76 1.50 or lower 1.51-1.75
Through 45 1.86 1.60 or lower 1.61-1.85
Through 60 1.96 1.70 or lower 1.71-1.95
61 or more 2.00 1.80 or lower 1.81-1.99

*The computation of the “Cumulative Registered Credit Hours” is defined as the total credit hours of all marking periods in which a student was registered. The computation of “Cumulative Registered Credit Hours” for transfer students includes the total number of transfer credit hours which apply to their Oswego degree program.

**Instructions for students in this category would accompany grade reports – review procedure in January may differ from that used in June.

Previously Disqualified Students

A written appeal process is possible for previously disqualified students. Materials must be requested from the appropriate Dean’s Office and the appeal filed by June 1 for Fall semester consideration or by December 1 for Spring semester consideration.

Reinstatement subsequent to disqualification is never automatic and the enrollment situation in specific majors and for the College in general may be factors in reinstatement decisions. A decision to reinstate a student will be conveyed in writing and will include the conditions under which the student is allowed to return to the College for a specific semester.

Procedures for Students Placed on Academic Warning

Students placed on Academic Warning, according to either of the standards defined above, will receive grade reports stamped “Academic Warning.” Students on Academic Warning are urged to see their advisors within the first three days of classes.

Academic Warning/Disqualification Procedures for Part-Time Matriculated Students (Degree Students)

Special explanations are necessary for part-time matriculated students because the Registered Credit Hour Standards often do not apply. Part-time students carry fewer than 12 credit hours during a marking period. Therefore, the academic status of part-time matriculated students will be determined as follows: 

  1. Satisfactory progress toward the degree
    Any part-time student who is permitted to register is considered to be making satisfactory progress toward the degree.
  2. Academic Warning
    Regardless of the number of credit hours carried during a marking period, if the GPA earned for that period is less than 2.00, the part-time student will be placed on academic warning.
  3. Academic Disqualification
    Academic disqualification for part-time students will be determined on the basis of their cumulative GPA for the total number of credit hours for which they have registered.

Academic Warning/Disqualification Standards for Non-matriculated Students (Non-degree Students)

Non-matriculated (non-degree) students are subject to the following scholarship standards:

  1. If, at nine credit hours of cumulative registered credit hours, the student’s cumulative index is 1.75 or lower, no additional registration is possible except with the approval of the Dean of Extended Learning.
  2. If, at 15 credit hours of cumulative registered credit hours, the student’s cumulative index is below 2.0, no additional registration is possible except with the approval of the Dean of Extended Learning.
  3. At 21 credit hours of cumulative registered credit hours, no additional registration is possible except with the approval of the Dean of Extended Learning provided that the student’s cumulative GPA is 2.0 or better.

Responsibilities and Notification of Students

  1. It is the responsibility of students to ascertain their status in each course at mid-semester.
  2. It is the responsibility of each student to notify parents or guardians and academic advisors of midsemester deficiencies (D+, D, D-, or E grades).
  3. It is the responsibility of students placed on academic warning to contact their academic advisors after receiving notice of this standing for mandatory readvisement before classes begin for the next semester.
  4. Semester grade reports of students placed on academic warning are stamped Academic Warning.
  5. Grade reports of students who are disqualified will be stamped: Disqualified-Subject to Review or Disqualified-Mandatory Semester Off.

Grading and Achievement

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Grading System

Letter grades assigned by instructors are used to indicate the quality of student achievement. The use of plus (+) and minus (-) grades is optional with the instructor.

Grade Explanation
A, A- Outstanding
B+, B, B- Above Average
C+, C, C- Average
D+, D, D- Below Average
E Failure
H High Honors
S Satisfactory
U Unsatisfactory
P Passing
F Failure
Inc Incomplete
IP In Progress
NG No Grade Transcripted this Semester
WP Withdraw Passing
WF Withdraw Failing
WN Withdraw without Grade
Z Instructor did not submit grade
AU Audit
* Classes not for credit

Grades of S or U are used for evaluating student teaching. Internships are graded H, S or U. Achievement in courses taken under the Pass-Fail option is indicated by P or F. A mark of IP (in process or progress) may be submitted by an instructor for students enrolled in thesis courses, research projects, and for courses in which a form of evaluation from off-campus is missing (e.g. GST courses, field placements or departmental internships). A mark of IP may be carried on a student’s transcript for a maximum of 4 semesters (without requesting extensions). At the end of the fourth semester, a grade must be submitted, or the IP automatically becomes an E grade. A mark of Inc is submitted by an instructor only if a student is unable to complete course requirements for reasons beyond the student’s control. If the course requirements are not completed by the end of the  sixth week of the following semester, an Incomplete will automatically become an E. A mark of Z means an instructor did not submit a grade. Students should immediately contact the instructor for further instructions.

Students expelled or suspended as a result of disciplinary actions will have an NG notation in the place of a grade on every course for which they are registered at the time of the expulsion or suspension, and the credits will count in the total attempted credits. The NG notation will become a permanent part of the students’ academic records (transcripts). Students with NG grades need to apply for readmission and have the dean of students’ approval before they can register again at Oswego. If the student is readmitted to the College, the courses with NG can be repeated; the NG notation, however, will remain part of the student’s academic history.

Grades of WP ,WF, or WN are used when a student petitions to withdraw from a course after the last day to drop a course. See the headings Course Withdrawal Policy and Late Course Withdrawal Policy in this section of the Catalog.

Quality Point System (or Grade Point Average)

Academic standing is based on the cumulative quality point index or grade point average (GPA), and it is determined by assigning a numerical value for each letter grade earned according to the following table:

Letter Grade Quality Points for Each Credit Hour
A 4.0
A- 3.67
B+ 3.33
B 3.0
B- 2.67
C+ 2.33
C 2.0
C- 1.67
D+ 1.33
D 1.0
D- 0.67
E 0

No other grades carry quality point value.

The quality point index for one semester is determined by dividing the number of quality points earned during the semester by the number of credit hours carried during the semester for all courses in which weighted grades were received. The following example illustrates how the quality point index is determined for one semester.

Course Credit Hrs Carried Credit Hrs Earned Grade Quality Points
Art 100

3

3 B+ 9.99
Eng 102 3 3 C- 5.01
Mat 120 3 3 C 6.00
Bio 101 4 4 A- 14.68
His 100      3           3      B   9.00  
  16 16   44.68
GPA =

           Quality Points Earned        
Credit Hours Carried

=  44.68  
16
= 2.793

In the foregoing illustration 44.68 quality points divided by 16 credit hours attempted yields a semester index of 2.793 or a 2.793 GPA.

The cumulative quality point index is determined by dividing the total number of quality points earned by the total number of credit hours carried for all courses in which weighted grades were received.

Cumulative GPA =

TOTAL QUALITY POINTS EARNED
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS CARRIED

The following grades are not computed in the grade point average: AU–Audit, S–Satisfactory, U–Unsatisfactory, P–Passing, F–Failure, H–High Honors, I–Incomplete, IP-In Progress, W–Withdrawal and Z–Instructor did not submit a grade.

Students admitted to pursue a second undergraduate degree begin with a new (0.00) GPA.

Completion of Incomplete Grades

Incomplete grades become E grades automatically if the incomplete grade is not completed by the end of the sixth week of the following semester. This is true whether or not the student is in attendance at the College. Exceptions apply only under the following circumstances:

  1. When a faculty member requests an extension because the nature of the course does not allow for the removal of the “I” grade in only one semester (e.g. thesis courses, research projects).
  2. When the student requests an extension with the approval of the pertinent faculty member for (a) a prolonged illness that can be documented with medical records or (b) absence due to active military service.

Under any of the above mentioned circumstances, the request for an extension must be submitted by the faculty member prior to the “sixth week of the following semester” deadline.

Repeating D or E grade Courses

Students may elect to repeat a course in which a grade of D (D+, D, D-) was earned. In certain majors, however, D grades are not acceptable. For specific information concerning each major, consult the program requirements for that major in this Catalog.

Courses in which a D grade was earned may be repeated. However, credit hours are earned only once for the same course. Courses for which an E grade was received must be repeated if they are required for the student’s degree program, minor program, or if they must be repeated as part of a student’s mandatory readvisement or condition of reinstatement following disqualification. Other E grade courses may be repeated at the option of the student.

Transcript notations for repeated D and E grades are as follows. When the course is repeated at Oswego by a student who is in good standing, credit hours, letter grade and quality points earned will be used in computing a new cumulative average. The previous D or E grade will remain on the transcript; however, the transcript will be annotated to indicate that the course has been repeated. When the course is repeated at any other college or university, only credit hours are transferred. The student’s GPA will not reflect the repeated course grade, although the student’s transcript is annotated to indicate that the course has been repeated and the effect of the earlier D or E grade is removed from the GPA.

Students must obtain approval to take course work off-campus. See the heading Approval for Off-Campus Study in the CURRICULUM INFORMATION section of this Catalog for additional information.

Repeating C Grade Courses

Courses in which grades of C- (C+, C, C-) or better were earned cannot be repeated. Should a student repeat such a course in violation of this policy, then (1) the original grade will not be altered in any form, (2) the new grade will not be used to recompute the semester or cumulative GPA, and (3) no additional credit hours will be added to the student’s total.

Repeating Transfer Courses

Students shall only receive credit for the same course once. When a course is taken at Oswego that was taken previously, the grade earned at Oswego is counted towards the GPA.

Transfer Credit: D Grades

Credits from courses in which a grade of “D” was earned transfer directly to Oswego undergraduate programs. Students in some programs, however, must earn at least a C- in those courses transferred to meet a core, cognate or major elective requirement. Transfer students should review program requirements carefully to comply with departmental policies on D grades. Thus, if a D grade was previously earned, the course may have to be repeated to satisfy program requirements. At the graduate level only grades of A or B are transferable.

Final Exam/Last Exam Policy

All courses will involve some form of comprehensive evaluation; final examinations are an integral part of this procedure in many cases. For every course requiring a final examination, the day and hour scheduled for this purpose must be used, and the examination must be limited to that specified period of time. All evening courses in which final examinations are to be given will hold the examination during final exam week at the day and hour of the regular class meeting.

The last examination of the semester in a course must be given during the final exam week at the scheduled time. During the last week of class, examinations may only be given if there is also a comprehensive examination given during the scheduled final examination period.

Pass-Fail Policy

The primary purpose of the Pass-Fail option is to afford juniors and seniors an opportunity to explore course work in areas outside of their regular degree requirements without the direct application of the normal letter grade scale to their grade point average. A course selected under the provisions of the Pass-Fail option, as outlined below, is assigned a grade of Pass (P) if the student earns a final grade of D- or above. The student is assigned a Fail (F) if the student earns an E for the course.

A Pass-Fail Option Form may be printed from the Registrar’s Office web page found at www.oswego.edu/registrar or obtained from the Registrar’s Office or the appropriate Deans’ Office.

  1. Only juniors and seniors (full-time or part-time) and non-degree students are eligible to elect the Pass-Fail option. Pass-Fail credit for non-degree students counts as general elective credit toward a degree program, if the student ultimately matriculates.
  2. Students may request the Pass-Fail option for no more than one course in any marking period, which includes any regular semester, or Summer Session. Students may take a maximum of four (4) courses (or 12 credit hours) on a Pass-Fail basis during their entire degree program.
  3. Excluded as Pass-Fail option courses are those in the following categories:
    1. courses in the student’s academic major or concentration,
    2. professional education courses,
    3. courses used to satisfy general education requirements in specific areas,
    4. courses used to satisfy cognate requirements,
    5. courses in the student’s academic minor.
  4. A student must have at least a 2.0 cumulative grade point average to apply for a Pass-Fail option.
  5. In terms of the provisions of the College Scholarship Standards, a Pass-Fail course is considered to be “completed course work.” A grade of Pass (P) constitutes “satisfactorily completed course work” as defined by the College Scholarship Standards.
  6. A student may file a Pass-Fail option under advisement at final registration or during the official add period. No Pass-Fail option request for semester (or quarter) courses are considered after the add deadline for semester (or quarter) courses.
  7. The instructor of the course is not informed that the student has filed a Pass-Fail option for the course. When the instructor submits a letter grade for the student, the registrar will convert it to a Pass (P) or Fail (F) grade.
  8. A student who has fewer than 12 credit hours of grades computed in the grade point average for any semester is not eligible for the President’s List or the Dean’s List honors. A Pass-Fail course is not computed in the grade point average.
  9. Because the Pass-Fail option is voluntarily elected by the student, it will not be removed in response to a subsequent student request. 

Auditing of Courses

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General Policy

A person is permitted to audit courses without credit if the instructor of the course determines that the person has an acceptable reason for auditing, that the person has sufficient academic background to benefit from the course, and that there is room in the class. The extent of an auditor’s participation in class is determined by the instructor. A Permission to Audit Form, available in the Office of the Registrar, signed by the instructor, should be submitted to the Office of the Registrar during the ADD Period. Audited courses will transcript with a grade of “AU” which does not accumulate credits nor compute in the grade point average.

Senior Citizens

Recognizing the commitment of the College to the senior citizens in this geographic area, the College has established the following guidelines for senior citizens who desire to audit any credit course given on or off the College campus. For purposes of this policy, a senior citizen is defined as a person 60 years of age or older.

A senior citizen desiring to audit a credit course must complete an Audit Form for Senior Citizens in consultation with the Office of Extended Learning. Upon approval by the appropriate department chair, the senior citizen will be informed of the procedure for class admission. It is understood, however, that privileges may be limited by the availability of class space. It is also understood that the audit privileges will not regularly be extended in all studio and laboratory courses.

There is no fee or any charge levied by the College for the audit privilege. Text books or other related materials may be purchased at the prevailing student price. Senior citizens should register as an auditor during the late registration/add period at the beginning of each semester.

Noncredit courses may not be audited as they are not state supported. Senior citizens may, of course, register for such courses upon payment of the regular fees.

Intellectual Integrity

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Preamble

Intellectual integrity on the part of all students is basic to individual growth and development through college course work. When academic dishonesty occurs, the teaching/learning climate is seriously undermined and student growth and development are impeded. For these reasons, any form of intellectual dishonesty is a serious concern and is therefore prohibited.

Also basic to the teaching/learning process in college course work is the authority of the course instructor to assign a grade to indicate the quality of student achievement.

STATEMENT ON INTELLECTUAL INTEGRITY

The State University of New York at Oswego is committed to maintaining rigorous intellectual standards and the highest level of academic integrity. The production of original work by all members of the College community is an essential component of the educational experience of students. Faculty and professional staff as leaders and role models must adhere to the highest standards of academic honesty in scholarship and professional practice. Students’ work must be the product of individual effort and an unambiguous reflection of the mastery of required knowledge and skills mandated within a program of study.

The College recognizes that promoting intellectual integrity in higher education is a multifaceted process. A learning climate where honest behavior is fostered by the formal and informal conventions of the institution is foundational. Students are made ready for the demands of citizenship and the assumption of roles of responsibility within the larger community by assuming personal responsibility and accepting accountability for their actions while still citizens of the more restricted, but no less demanding, community of scholars. We seek to build character not merely prescriptively but by providing students the opportunity to authentically practice intellectual honesty like the many other behaviors that are mastered here.

The pursuit of academic honesty can be organized around three  guiding principles. First, all members of the College community should be held to the highest standards of honesty and personal responsibility. Secondly, the expectations for intellectual integrity should be clearly articulated, as should the consequences for violation of these standards. Finally, all members of the College community are entitled to due process when the honesty of their intellectual efforts or products is called into question.

Definitions of Intellectual Dishonesty, Cheating, and Plagiarism

Intellectual Dishonesty—In an academic community, one critical outcome of intellectual dishonesty is that the instructor is prevented from knowing the truth with respect to the student’s level of mastery of course content. Further facilitation of learning and accurate evaluation of student achievement is thereby jeopardized. Intellectual dishonesty can take many forms. Examples of intellectual dishonesty include making up or falsifying data, etc. It may also take the form of intellectual carelessness, which, while not intentionally deceptive, has the same outcome and may be treated as academic dishonesty.

Cheating—
Intellectual dishonesty may take the form of cheating when one presents as one’s own work the work of another. Some examples of cheating include, but are not limited to, the following:

  1. copying an examination, assignment or other work to be evaluated.
  2. collaboration on work to be evaluated not authorized by the instructor.
  3. the use of “cheat sheets. ”
  4. buying/selling examinations, term papers.
  5. use of “ringers:” having another student take an exam; having another student write a term paper or assignment for which the student will receive credit.
  6. submitting work for which credit has already been received in another course without the express consent of the instructor.

Plagiarism—One particular form of intellectual dishonesty is plagiarism (i.e., the representation of another’s words, thoughts, or ideas as one’s own). While it is expected that a student who is engaged in writing will utilize information from sources other than personal experience, appropriate acknowledgment of such sources is required. Some examples of plagiarism include:

  1. utilizing a direct quotation without citing the source;
  2. paraphrasing the ideas, interpretation, expressions of another person without giving credit; and,
  3. representing the thought of others as one’s own by failing to acknowledge or document sources. Sources of information should be credited or footnoted by following an English language style guide (e.g.,Modern Language Association Style Sheet, The Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association).

Student Responsibilities

Each student has a responsibility to assist in protecting the integrity of the degrees which this College grants by (1) not participating, either directly or indirectly, in intellectual dishonesty in any form, (2) actively discouraging intellectual dishonesty by others, and (3) reporting to the course instructor in a timely manner any known incidents of intellectual dishonesty.

Faculty Responsibilities

Each faculty member has a responsibility to assist in protecting the integrity of the degrees which this College grants by (1) informing students of the intellectual dishonesty policy and of any specific interpretation of that policy particular to a given course, (2) actively discouraging cheating or plagiarism, and (3) implementing recommended procedures for dealing with intellectual dishonesty in instances where substantial evidence of misconduct exists.

Procedures for Dealing with Intellectual Dishonesty

Students suspected of intellectual dishonesty shall be so informed and are entitled to an opportunity to reveal their understanding of cheating/plagiarism in a private discussion with the course instructor prior to the assessment of any penalty. The instructor or the student may choose to have a witness present for the discussion without impairing the privacy of the discussion.

Instructors who determine that a student has engaged in an act of intellectual dishonesty may impose an academic penalty, including that of a failing grade for the course on that student. The instructor may choose an alternative procedure and pursue disciplinary action through the administration of the Code of Student Rights, Responsibilities and Conduct (refer to the Student Handbook). Before taking action under this section, instructors shall consult with their department chairs and appropriate dean to discuss an appropriate penalty before informing the student of the decision in writing.

The instructor shall notify the student of the decision to impose an academic penalty and the basis for that decision. The instructor shall copy that notification to his/her dean along with the following information: the class and semester, a copy of the assignment, due date of the assignment, the work submitted by the student and evidence to support the charge of intellectual dishonesty.

The Dean’s Office will notify the student’s academic advisor in broad terms and ask that the advisor follow-up with a meeting with the student to discuss academic integrity.

The Dean’s Office will forward this material to the Office of the Provost who will maintain all such material for a period of at least one year beyond the student’s graduation or permanent separation from the college.

A student who thinks the penalty assigned by the instructor is inappropriate may appeal the penalty using the following academic appeal process:

  1. first, to the instructor involved;
  2. then, to the chair of the department in which the course is offered;
  3. and finally, using the Judicial Affairs Office, the student may appeal to the appropriate academic dean. The Judicial Affairs Office will work with the student to prepare the final appeal and will submit the appeal on behalf of the student.

An instructor may not impose an academic penalty and pursue disciplinary action against a student for the same act of academic dishonesty. However, when a student is involved in repeated breaches of academic integrity, disciplinary action may be initiated against that student by the appropriate dean.

In situations where these procedures cannot be followed, it is essential that the spirit of these procedures be met (e.g., extended email discussion in lieu of face-to-face meetings would be an appropriate response to distance learning classes where meetings between instructor and student could not take place).

Academic and Judicial Options

The individual faculty member has the right and the responsibility to assign student grades, including academic penalties. The academic appeal process terminates in the appropriate academic dean’s office. However, if disciplinary action is initiated through the Dean of Students’ Office it is a judgmental procedure. Thus, final authority for the determination of any penalty to be invoked for cheating through the disciplinary process rests with the Dean of Students’ Office.

Dropping, Adding, Withdrawal and Readmission Policies

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Add Policy

Semester Courses—Semester courses may be added between the first day of instruction and the end of the eighth day of instruction. Courses may be added using the myOswego registration system (myoswego.oswego.edu). The exceptions are those courses which are controlled by the instructor or department. These courses require an ADD Form, signed by the instructor or department as appropriate, submitted to the Registrar’s Office by the end of the eighth day of instruction.

Quarter Courses—Quarter courses may be added between the first day of instruction and the end of the fourth day of instruction. Courses may be added using the myOswego (myoswego.oswego.edu) registration system. The exceptions are those courses which are controlled by the instructor or department. These courses require an ADD Form, signed by the instructor or department as appropriate, submitted to the Registrar’s Office by the end of the fourth day of instruction.

Drop Policy

Semester Courses—Students may voluntarily drop semester courses between the first day of instruction and the end of the fifteenth day of instruction. To drop a course the student may use the myOswego registration system (myoswego.oswego.edu). Courses dropped using these procedures will not appear on the student’s transcript. It is the responsibility of students to drop those courses they no longer are attending.

Quarter Courses—Students may voluntarily drop quarter courses between the first day of instruction and the end of the eighth day of instruction. To drop a course the student may use the myOswego registration system (myoswego.oswego.edu). Courses dropped using these procedures will not appear on the student’s transcript. It is the responsibility of students to drop those courses they no longer are attending.

Drops at Instructor Discretion

Students who have two unexcused absences during the first two class meetings of the semester may be dropped from the course at the discretion of the instructor. The instructor or the department offering the course will notify the Registrar of this action which terminates a student’s registration in that course. However, students should not assume that they have been dropped from a class just because the first two classes were missed. It is ultimately the responsibility of students to drop a course that they are not planning to attend by the deadline published in the Official College Calendar. Failure to do this may result in a failing grade for the course.

Late Add Policy

After the date specified as the last day to add either quarter (four instructional days) or semester courses (eight instructional days), a student may add a course only if given permission by the course instructor and the dean of the college or school of the students major. All parties involved indicate their permission by signing an ADD Form which must be delivered by the student to the Registrar’s Office. The student may be required to pay a processing fee for filing a record of this transaction after the deadline to add courses.

Course Withdrawal Policy

A student may withdraw from a course in either the fall semester or the spring semester, after the end of the fifteenth day of instruction through the end of the last class day of the ninth week. The student must complete a Course Withdrawal Form, which must be signed by the course instructor and have the signature of the dean of the school or college of the student’s major. Once the request is approved by the dean, the student must submit the completed form to the Registrar’s Office by the published withdrawal date.

Appropriate fee(s) will be assessed and must be paid before processing the course withdrawal form after the published drop date.

A grade of WP will be assigned by the instructor if the student is passing the course at the time of filing of the forms; a grade of WF will be assigned by the instructor if the student is failing the course at the time of filing of the forms; a grade of WN will be assigned by the instructor if no grade has been established at the time of filing of the forms. These grades are not used to calculate a GPA, but the hours are counted as hours for which the student was enrolled that semester.

Documented Late Course Withdrawal Policy

After the end of the last class day of the ninth week in either the fall semester or the spring semester through the last day of classes/instruction for the respective semester, if a student believes that the student’s circumstances are extraordinary (poor performance in a course is not an extraordinary circumstance), a student may petition for late withdrawal from a course for documented extenuating circumstances beyond the student’s control which occurred after the end of the last class day of the ninth week in either the fall semester or the spring semester through the last day of classes/instruction for the respective semester (change of employment hours, major illness or death in immediate family, student’s own major illness, the onset of which occurred after the last class day of the ninth week in either fall semester or spring semester).

The instructor of the course must indicate approval or disapproval of the late course withdrawal by signing the Late Course Withdrawal Form. Additionally, the documentation (a health care provider’s verification of student illness [physical or psychological] or of major illness of immediate family member; copy of obituary, listing relationship of deceased to student, letter from student’s employer) of the alleged extenuating circumstances must be received by the dean of the school or college of the student’s major at the time of submission of form. The appropriate dean has final authority to approve or disapprove documented late course withdrawal(s).

Appropriate fee(s) will be assessed and must be paid before processing late course withdrawal form after the published drop date.

A grade of WP will be assigned by the instructor if the student is passing the course at the time of filing of the forms; a grade of WF will be assigned by the instructor if the student is failing the course at the time of filing of the forms; a grade of WN will be assigned by the instructor if no grade has been established at the time of filing of the forms. These grades are not used to calculate a GPA , but the hours are counted as hours for which the student was enrolled that semester.

Withdrawal from College

A student who finds it necessary or advisable to withdraw from the College must obtain a withdrawal form from COMPASS, the student advisement center, complete an exit interview and obtain signatures from Student Accounts, Residence Life and Housing, and Financial Aid. The form must be returned to the Registrar’s Office before the withdrawal is official. Failure to withdraw officially will jeopardize the student’s chances for readmission or recommendation by the College. No fees can be refunded without full compliance with this policy.

A student after having complied with the provisions above, may withdraw from the College during the stated withdrawal period, as published in the Official College Calendar. A grade of WP will be assigned by the instructor if the student is passing the course at the time of the withdrawal; a grade of WF will be assigned by the instructor if the student is failing the course at the time of the withdrawal; a grade of WN will be assigned by the instructor if no grade has been established at the time of the withdrawal. These grades are not used to calculate GPAs, but the hours are counted  as hours for which the student was enrolled that semester.

Students withdrawing from the College after the last day of the ninth week of the semester and who have documented extenuating circumstances beyond the student’s control may be assigned grades of WP ,WF, or WN, as described above and consistent with the Late Course Withdrawal Policy. Students unable to provide such documentation will receive the letter grade awarded by the instructor based on the work submitted for the entire semester.

Medical Leave of Absence

A matriculated student who withdraws from the College for medical reasons may apply for a Medical Leave of Absence.  A Medical Leave of Absence will facilitate a student’s return to Oswego if the student wishes to return within one year.  Students needing extended time should apply for an extension with appropriate documentation.

To apply for Medical Leave of Absence, a student must submit medical documentation along with an Official Withdrawal Form to the Student Advisement Center at the Compass.  Documentation of medical circumstances beyone the student’s control must be from a physician or counselor/therapist and must provide support for the student’s withdrawal from college.

To return to Oswego, a student on Medical Leave of Absence must notify the Registrar’s Office of his or her intent to return to Oswego.  A student on Medical Leave of Absence may participate in the Advance Registration period only after he or she has notified the Registrar’s Office.

If the Medical Leave of Absence expires, a student must follow the procedures for readmission to the College.

Military Leave of Absence

A matriculated student who is called up to active duty with the military or deployed for military action is eligible for a Military Leave of Absence.  A Military Leave of Absence will facilitate a student’s return to Oswego if the student wishes to return within one year from the date of discharge from active service or return from deployment.

To obtain a Military Leave of Absence, a student must submit a copy of his or her military orders along with an Official Withdrawal Form to the Student Advisement Center at the Compass.

To return to Oswego, a student on Military Leave of Absence must notify the Registrar’s Office of his or her intent to return to Oswego.  A student on Military Leave of Absence may participate in the Advance Registration period only after he or she has notified the Registrar’s Office.  Documentation of discharge or reassignment will be required.

If the Military Leave of Absence expires, a student must follow the procedures for readmission to the College.

Summer Session Deadlines

Add and drop deadlines for the Summer Session are determined on the basis of the length of the specified course. These deadlines are published in the summer course bulletin.

Readmission Policies

General—Students seeking readmission to the College must apply in writing by completing the Application for Readmission Form. The form must be returned to the Registrar’s Office.

Forgiveness Policy—
At the discretion of the appropriate academic dean, this policy may be applied to disqualified students who are seeking readmission to Oswego after two or more years of absence and who cannot reenter Oswego voluntarily because of their previous academic record.

A student who has disqualified and wants to return to the College after a separation of at least two calendar years must appeal for reinstatement. After the review process is complete, the student may be given “permission to register” for up to fifteen hours of three or four credit-hour courses.1

At the end of that initial semester of study (or upon the completion of twelve hours of part-time work), a student who has earned at least a 2.00 average for those approved courses must immediately:

  1. Request consideration for reinstatement through the regular academic appeals process, or
  2. Request reinstatement and “academic forgiveness” for the Oswego work completed prior to disqualification. If the student chooses the “forgiveness” option, the following regulations apply:
    1. All grades earned at Oswego remain a part of the transcript. However, as a result of being granted forgiveness, a student receives credit hours toward the total degree requirement for only those courses taken prior to the student’s two year absence from SUNY Oswego in which the student earned a grade of “C” or better. No courses taken before the student disqualification will be averaged in. Forgiveness of the earlier cumulative GPA allows the student the opportunity to pursue a degree without facing continuous disqualification.
    2. For purposes of determining academic status (good standing/warning/disqualification/graduation), a second (recomputed) cumulative average is determined beginning with the course work completed after the minimum two-year absence.
    3. In order to earn honors, the student must have completed 45 hours between the readmission to Oswego and the semester before graduation.
    4. Consultation with the Dean (or the Dean’s designee) in the College or School in which the student is majoring, is required. The Dean will notify the Registrar that approval of the “forgiveness” option has been granted.
    5. The “forgiveness” option is extended only once during the student’s enrollment at Oswego.

1 Interpretive Note: Students who experienced academic difficulties in the past are urged to think in terms of twelve or thirteen credit hours during the initial semester’s work. A decision to take fifteen hours should be thoroughly reviewed with the advisor and appropriate dean.

Prerequisite/Corequisite Policy

Definitions of Terms

Prerequisite — a course or other requirement that a student must have taken prior to enrolling in a specific course or program.
Corequisite— a course or other requirement that a student must take at the same time as another course or requirement.
Advisement Recommendation— a condition of enrollment that a student is advised, but not required, to meet before enrolling in a course or program.

Prerequisite/Corequisite Challenge Policy

In cases where the student does not meet a stated prerequisite or corequisite of a course and there is no “or permission of instructor” qualifier in such listing, the student may submit a Prerequisite Deviation Form to the home department of the course to seek approval for registering for it.
A Prerequisite Deviation Form in such cases may require additional written documentation, explanation of alternative coursework, background, or abilities which adequately prepare the student for the course.
The signature of the student’s advisor and the department chair of the home department of the course or someone authorized to sign for the chair signifies approval of the deviation. A copy of the form will be kept in the student’s permanent folder digitally imaged, and the student will be given a copy for his or her record upon request.

Context and Rationale

A department may change the prerequisite or corequisite identified for a course to “Advisement Recommendation” or add an “or Permission of Instructor” to its listing.
“Advisement Recommendation” by definition is advisory and requires no challenge process.
For courses that have the “or Permission of Instructor” in their prerequisite or corequisite listing, the instructor’s decision shall be final. In such cases, the department has left the decision for approving an “Add” to the instructor of the course.
The Challenge Policy only applies when an explicit prerequisite or corequisite is identified for a course.
Documenting the acceptance of a challenge is important for the student and the institution. Whether the faculty member teaching the course or the department chair or a designee considers the challenge should be a departmental decision.

Class Attendance

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General

Regular class attendance is obligatory. Faculty may consider attendance when determining grades, subject to the policies below.

Absence from Class

Religious Beliefs

The following statement regarding absence from class because of a student’s religious beliefs is taken from State Education Law, paragraph 224a.

  1. No person shall be expelled from or be refused admission as a student to an institution of higher education for the reason that he is unable, because of his religious beliefs, to attend classes or to participate in any examination, study or work requirements on a particular day or days.
  2. Any student in an institution of higher education who is unable, because of his religious beliefs, to attend classes on a particular day or days shall, because of such absence on the particular day or days, be excused from any examination or any study or work requirements.
  3. It shall be the responsibility of the faculty and of the administrative officials of each institution of higher education to make available to each student who is absent from school, because of his religious beliefs, an equivalent opportunity to make up any examination, study or work requirements which he may have missed because of such absence on any particular day or days. No fees of any kind shall be charged by the institution for making available to the said student such equivalent opportunity.
  4. If classes, examinations, study or work requirements are held on Friday after four o’clock post meridian or on Saturday, similar or makeup classes, examinations, study or work requirements shall be made available on other days, where it is possible and practicable to do so. No special fees shall be charged to the student for these classes, examinations, study or work requirements held on other days.
  5. In effectuating the provisions of this section, it shall be the duty of the faculty and of the administrative officials of each institution of higher education to exercise the fullest measure of good faith. No adverse or prejudicial effects shall result to any student because of his availing himself of the provisions of this section.
  6. Any student, who is aggrieved by the alleged failure of any faculty or administrative officials to comply in good faith with the provisions of this section, shall be entitled to maintain an action or proceeding in the supreme court of the county in which such institution of higher education is located for the enforcement of his rights under this section.
  7. As used in this section, the term “institution of higher education” shall mean schools under the control of the board of trustees of the State University of New York or of the board of higher education of the City of New York or any community college.

Students who feel that this policy has not been fairly implemented may appeal to the appropriate department office or appropriate dean.

Athletic Team Membership

  1. A student who because of her/his membership on an officially sanctioned athletic team with officially scheduled competitions is unable to attend classes on a particular day or days shall because of such absence be excused.
  2. Faculty and administrative officials of the institution must provide each student who is absent from school because of such competitions an equal opportunity to make up any course requirements which the student(s) may have missed because of such absence. No fees of any kind shall be charged by the institution for this opportunity. At the same time, the absent student shall not expect the instructor to repeat the entire lecture or laboratory session.
  3. Coaches of each athletic team must provide the student athlete a list with dates of officially scheduled competitions. The student must give this list to faculty and to the administrative officials affected by these provisions at least one class meeting prior to the first competition, and at least one class meeting prior to any post-season competitions. It is the responsibility of the Athletic Director to see that all coaches comply with this provision.
  4. It is the responsibility of the student who misses any classes under these provisions to contact the instructor of each class prior to the anticipated absence to arrange for making up course requirements affected by the provisions. It is also the student’s responsibility to inform the coaches and faculty affected by these provisions of changes to their athletic schedules at the time of the change. It shall be the responsibility of the Academic Advisor for Athletics to monitor student athletes changes of schedules and notification of coaches.
  5. Faculty and administrative officials of the institution must ensure that students do not suffer unfairly because of these provisions. Students who feel that this policy has not been fairly implemented by faculty may appeal to the appropriate department office; if it is felt that no satisfaction is received there, then the student may appeal to the appropriate dean.

Hours of Operation

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Generally administrative and departmental offices operate from 8 AM to 4:30 PM weekdays except for holidays. Some administrative offices remain open on weekends by appointment. Academic buildings generally open by 7 AM and close by 10 PM weekdays except for certain buildings, such as Penfield Library, which have more flexible hours. Some academic buildings are open on weekends. During specific holiday periods and between semesters the residence halls and dining halls are not open. Administrative offices close at 4 PM during the summer.

Specific information is published in the Official College Calendar, the faculty/staff newsletter and the student newspaper.

Canceled Classes Due to Weather

To find out if classes are canceled because of inclement weather, members of the campus community have several options: check www.oswego.edu, the SUNY Oswego website; call 312-3333, the SUNY Oswego Information Line; listen to radio and television; or, in residence halls, see digital signage notification or check with the front desk.

Members of the campus community may receive direct notification as well, if they have signed up to receive campus alerts through NY-Alert. Students indicate their preferences through myOswego under personal information. Faculty and staff enter their contact information by logging on to the employee portal on www.suny.edu, the SUNY system website.

Classes will proceed as scheduled unless official announcements of cancellation are made. When classes are canceled, faculty and commuting students are advised not to come to campus.

Among the TV and radio stations making this college’s class cancellation announcements are TV Channels 3, 5, 9 and 10 in Syracuse, the WRVO Stations (FM 89.9 to 91.9 throughout Central Upstate New York); WWTI Newswatch 50 in Watertown; and Clear Channels in Syracuse (WSYR AM 570, Y94 FM 94.5, etc.) and Rochester (WHAM 1180, etc.).

The public announcement of class cancellations only occurs when the entire campus of thousands of students and faculty are affected. Faculty members wishing to cancel their own classes should follow the same procedure used when they are ill. Faculty teaching classes at locations other than the main Oswego campus and the SUNY Oswego Phoenix Center should follow the weather closing policy governing the class site and inform students how to find out if their class is canceled.

The college does not close when classes are canceled. Under the state’s regulations, only the governor has the authority to close a state agency such as SUNY Oswego. Unless the governor closes the college, employees who choose not to come to work or to leave work early are required to charge their time. The only exception is for instructional faculty when classes have been canceled.

Honors and Awards

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Academic honors recognized at commencements are determined by grades earned at Oswego prior to the semester preceding graduation. Seniors who do not qualify for graduation honors prior to their graduation, but who qualify at the end of their last semester will have the academic honor indicated on the diploma. All seniors, including transfer students, must have enrolled in a total of at least 45 credit hours in residence by the semester in which the commencement is to occur in order to qualify for commencement honors.

It is understood that the student will maintain honors level work for the balance of the academic program.

Part-time students will be included on the Dean’s or President’s List based on cumulative grade point average following the completion of each 15 credit hour block of coursework (e.g., a part-time student who has completed 18 credit hours over four semesters would be included on the Dean’s or President’s List based on cumulative grade point average at the end of the semester in which the student has completed a minimum of 15 credit hours: the next time the student would be eligible for inclusion based on cumulative grade point average is at the end of the semester the student completes 30 credit hours of coursework; etc.).

The following honors are awarded at the annual spring Honors Convocation:

Individual Awards

Oswego Alumni Association
Charles Turner Graduate Award
Sheldon Scholar Awards

Oswego College Foundation
Dorothy Rogers Memorial Scholarship
Lois and Paul Goodwin Memorial Scholarship

Division of Extended Learning
Eta Gamma Chapter of Alpha Sigma Lambda Scholarship

Honors
Patti McGill Peterson Honors Program Award

Intercollegiate Athletics
Donald Snygg Award
Oswego Woman Scholar Athlete Award

Office of Learning Services
Hubert B. Smith Award

Vega
Vega Awards for Academic Excellence

School of Business

Accounting, Finance and Law
New York State Society of Certified Public Accountants Academic Awards
New York State Society of Certified Public Accountants Career Preparation Awards
American Society of Women Accountants Scholarship
Michael O’Brien ‘81 Memorial Scholarship
Outstanding Finance Award
Susan F. Wain ‘69 Scholarship

Marketing and Management
Outstanding Business Student (John Parr) Award
Outstanding Marketing Senior Award
Society for Human Resources Jr. and Sr. Awards

School of Communication, Media and the Arts

Art
Herman Krusi Award

Communication Studies
Dr. I. David Glick Scholarship for Excellence in Communication
J. Edward McEvoy Memorial Scholarship
Vernon E. Rank Outstanding Senior Award
Dr. Manjula Ravindra Shah Memorial Scholarship
Robert C. Ziegler Memorial Scholarship

Music
Distinguished Music Award

Theatre
Olla G. Rickett Award for Excellence in Theatre

School of Education

Class of 1945 Scholarship
Class of 1953 Memorial Scholarship
Class of 1954 Memorial Scholarship
Gillespie/Pietroski Scholarship
Father Robert E. Hall Memorial Scholarship
Ted ‘72 and Jane Friedlander Jenny ‘71 Education Scholarship
Anna Mae Johnson ‘42 Scholarship
Mary Laing Scholarship Award
Stan Levonson Scholarship
Constance LaRock Seeber ‘53 and Ada Linsler ‘37 Scholarship
Virginia G. Gibson Vogel ‘56 Memorial Scholarship
Lew Widoff ‘69 Teaching for Social Justice Award

Alpha Iota Chapter of Delta Kappa Gamma
Lucy Wing Scholarship Awards

Counseling and Psychological Services
Thomas H. Chapman Memorial Award
Donald Snygg Graduate Scholarship
Lucy Wing Research Award

Curriculum and Instruction
Finter-Yager Award
Lisa Frank Memorial Scholarship
James ‘41 and Nina ‘43 Hastings Scholarship
Hazel Hewitt Scholarship Fund
Charles A. Leonard and Margaret S. Leonard Scholarship
R. Lee Martin Award
Greta O’Brien Murabito ’43 Memorial Award

Health, Promotion and Wellness
David A. Campbell Memorial Fund

Technology
Carlotta L. Hamm Award
William R. Keener ’30 Memorial Scholarship
Claude W.Weyant Award
James R. Hastings Professional Field Experience Awards
Robert Davis Helsby ’40 Memorial Award
Department of Technology Memorial Fund

Vocational Teacher Preparation
National Business Education Association Award of Merit

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Anthropology
Norman E.Whitten Award for Outstanding Achievement in
Anthropology

Biological Sciences
Norman J. Gillette Outstanding Senior in Biology Award
Martin V. Torok Memorial Award
Zoology Senior Award

Chemistry
Pearle A. Monroe Scholarship
Willy G. Schuh, Jr., Outstanding Senior Award in Chemistry
Anthony L. VanGeet Scholarship
National American Chemical Society Award in Analytical Chemistry

Cognitive Science
Distinguished Cognitive Science Senior Award

Computer Science
Oebele G. Van Dyk Outstanding Senior Award

Earth Sciences
Charles H. Jerred Memorial Award for Outstanding Astronomy Student
Outstanding Graduate in Geology
Outstanding Senior in Meteorology Award

Economics
Outstanding Senior in Economics Award
Richard Hyse Outstanding Economic Student Award

English
Helen Buckley Award
Erwin G. Palmer Award
Georgia Barnes Scholarship Award

Global Studies
Outstanding Achievement Award in Global Studies

History
Marion Mahar Memorial Award
Virginia L. Radley Fellowship
Phi Alpha Theta Award

Information Science
Outstanding Senior in Information Science Award

Linguistics
Ferdinand de Saussure Award

Mathematics
Louis R. DeRitter Awards
Emmet C. Stopher Calculus Award
John Walcott Award (Elementary Education)

Modern Languages and Literatures
Excellence in French Award
Goethe House NY Award/German
American Association of Teachers of Spanish/Portuguese Award

Philosophy
Paideia Award for Excellence in Philosophy

Physics
Outstanding Physics Major Award

Political Science
Outstanding Achievement Award
Douglas Eckert Memorial Award

Pre-med
Walter Freund Memorial Scholarship

Psychology

Award for Outstanding Senior in Human Development
Helen B. Daly Award for Excellence in Research Award for
The Award for Outstanding Senior in Human Development
William G. McGarvey Outstanding Senior in Psychology Award

Public Justice
Outstanding Senior in Public Justice Award
Outstanding Senior in Law Enforcement Award

Sociology
W. Seward Salisbury Award for Outstanding Senior in Sociology

Women’s Studies
Women’s Studies/Diana Balmori Award

Honors Program with Individual Major Programs

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Honors programs have been instituted for outstanding students in the fields of biology, chemistry, economics, history, mathematics, meteorology, physics, political science, and psychology. The eligibility requirements for these programs are rigorous, and the course work itself is beyond the scope of that of regular classes. Those students who meet the requirements are encouraged to apply for that program in their major field by the middle of their fourth semester. Interested students should consult the chairpersons of the respective departments offering honors programs.

Honor Societies

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One of the great academic achievements of any student is the election to an honor society in the student’s major field of interest. Oswego students have the opportunity to gain recognition by the following societies.

Alpha Delta Omega   public justice honor society
Alpha Kappa Delta   sociology honor society
Alpha Psi Omega   national dramatics honor society
Alpha Sigma Lambda   adult learners honor society
Beta Alpha Psi   national business honor society
Beta Gamma Sigma   international business honor society for AACSB accredited schools
Delta Phi Alpha   German honor society
Epsilon Pi Tau   international honor professional fraternity for education in technology
Kappa Delta Pi   international education honor society
Lambda Alpha   anthropology honor society
Lambda Pi Eta   national communication studies honor society
Mu Beta Psi   national honorary musical fraternity
Omicron Delta Kappa   national leadership honor society
Phi Alpha Theta   international history honor society
Phi Beta Lambda   national business organization
Phi Kappa Phi   national honor society
Pi Delta Phi   French honor society
Pi Kappa Lambda   national music honor society
Pi Sigma Alpha   national political science honor society
Psi Chi   national honor society for psychology
Sigma Pi Sigma   national honor society in physics
Sigma Xi   scientific research society
Tau Sigma   academic honor society

In addition students may be elected to Vega, the honor society for junior and senior women.

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