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2010-2011 Undergraduate Catalog
State University of New York at Oswego
   
 
  Nov 21, 2017
 
 
    
2010-2011 Undergraduate Catalog [Archived Catalog]

Curriculum Information


Academic Components of the College

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The academic departments are located in either the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences; the School of Business; the School of Communication, Media and the Arts; or the School of Education. Most of the degree programs are administered by individual departments, such as Physics, but some degree programs are interdisciplinary, such as Linguistics, and thus are administered by faculty from a variety of departments. The academic departments are grouped as follows:

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

 

Anthropology
  Biological Sciences
  Chemistry
  Computer Science
  Earth Sciences
  Economics
  English and CreativeWriting
  History
  Mathematics
  Modern Languages and Literatures
  Philosophy
  Physics
  Political Science
  Psychology
  Public Justice
  Sociology

School of Business

 

Accounting, Finance, and Law

  Marketing and Management

School of Communication, Media and the Arts

 

Art

  Communication Studies
  Music
  Theatre

School of Education

 

Counseling and Psychological Services

  Curriculum and Instruction
  Health Promotion and Wellness
  Technology
  Vocational Teacher Preparation
   

Curricula of the College

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Oswego offers courses of study in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences; the School of Business; the School of Communication, Media and the Arts; and the School of Education.

The rationale for the curriculum is that, within liberal limits, students, with the aid of faculty and administration, may define their own formal education. The following paragraphs are designed to inform students of these limits and to provide general and specific information about the curriculum.

Undergraduate Majors and Degrees Awarded

The undergraduate academic majors available at Oswego, their HEGIS codes, and the degree awarded are listed below. Program requirements for the degree are found in this Catalog under the major listing, titled Academic Degree Programs.

Major Degree HEGIS Code
Accounting BS/MBA 0502/0506
Adolescence Education (7-12) - Certification Areas:    
   Biology BS 0401.01
   Chemistry BS 1905.01
   Earth Science BS 1917.01
   English BS 1501.01
   French BS 1102.01
   German BS 1103.01
   Mathematics BS 1701.01
   Physics BS 1902.01
   Social Studies BS 2201.01
   Spanish BS 1105.01
Agricultural Education (all grades) BS 0899.10
Agricultural Education (7-12) BS 0839.04
American Studies BA 0313.00
Anthropology BA 2202.00
Applied Mathematical Economics BS 2204.00
Applied Mathematics BS 1703.00
Art (Studio) BFA 1001.00
Art (Graphic Design) BFA 1009.00
Art BA 1002.00
Biochemistry BS 0414.00
Biology BA, BS 0401.00
Broadcasting and Mass Communication BA 0601.00
Business Administration BS 0506.00
Business and Marketing Education (all grades) BS 0501.01
Chemistry BA, BS 1905.00
Childhood Education (1-6) BS 0802.00
Concentration Areas: Biology; English; Science; French; Social Studies; German; Spanish; Mathematics;Women’s Studies    
Cinema and Screen Studies BA 1010.00
Cognitive Science BA, BS 4901.00
Communication BA 0601.00
Computer Science BA, BS 0701.00
Creative Writing BA 1507.00
Economics BA 2204.00
English BA 1501.00
Family & Consumer Science Education (7-12) BS 0839.05
Finance BS 0504.00
French BA 1102.00
Geochemistry BS 1915.00
Geology BA, BS 1914.00
German BA 1103.00
Global and International Studies BA 0399.00
Health Careers Education (7-12) BS 0839.07
History BA 2205.00
Human Development BA 2001.00
Human Resource Management BS 0515.00
Information Science BA 0702.00
Journalism BA 0602.00
Language and International Trade BA 1199.00
Linguistics BA 1505.00
Management Accounting BS 0502.00
Marketing BS 0509.00
Mathematics BA, BS 1701.00
Meteorology BS 1913.00
Music BA 1005.00
Operations Management & Information Science BA 0507.00
Philosophy BA 1509.00
Philosophy-Psychology BA 4903.00
Physics BA, BS 1902.00
Political Science BA 2207.00

Psychology

BA 2001.00
Psychology BA/MBA 2001/0506
Psychology BA/MA 2001/0799
Public Accounting BS 0502.00
Public Accounting BS/MBA 0506.00
Public Justice BA 2105.00
Public Relations BA 0604.00

Sociology

BA 2208.00
Software Engineering BS 0999.00
Spanish BA 1105.00
Teaching English to Speakers of other Languages (TESOL) BS 1508.00
Technical Education (7-12) BS 0839.02
Technology Education (all grades) BS 0839.01
Technology Management BS 0599.00
Theatre BA 1007.00
Trade Education BS 0839.03
Wellness Management BS 0837.00
Women’s Studies BA 4903.00
Zoology BA, BS 0407.00

Restriction on Enrollment in Specified Programs

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Because of very heavy student interest in particular major programs, admission to these programs, both at the freshmen and transfer levels, may be restricted, and therefore more competitive. Students should contact the Office of Admissions or the appropriate department chair for the procedures used in determining eligibility for programs.

Academic Advisement

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Each academic department has an advisement coordinator responsible for assigning advisors to students entering the department. Students seeking information regarding a particular program should contact the advisement coordinator for that program. The name and telephone numbers of advisement coordinators may be found through the department. A number of departments also have Advisement Centers that offer a variety of services for students.

COMPASS, a comprehensive advisement and career planning center, assigns advisors to all undeclared students and offers additional support to all students on academic progress, college policies, and general issues related to academic success.

Incoming first-year students are assigned a first-year advisor from his or her major or a closely related department. These specially trained advisors contact the students prior to the beginning of classes and assist the student with the transition from high school to college by meeting regularly throughout the first year.

First semester freshman and first semester juniors are required to meet with their assigned advisors. A second Personal Identification Number (PIN) is assigned to each student in order to facilitate this meeting. Students need to get the PIN from their assigned advisor in order to register for the following semester’s courses.

Academic Major

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Students entering the College as freshmen may be accepted either into a major program, or as undeclared. Transfer students must declare a major on application to the College. All students are required to declare a major by completing a Declaration of Change of Major/Minor Form no later than the midpoint of their degree program.

A
second major may be declared in any academic area within the College. Students wanting to declare a second major should complete a Declaration or Change of Major/Minor Form. The degree that the student receives will be associated with the first or primary major. For example, a person may be a Business Administration (Bachelor of Science degree) major who chooses a second major in Economics (Bachelor of Arts degree). Such a student must fulfill all degree requirements for Business Administration but only the major requirements for Economics. Likewise, a Mathematics major (Bachelor of Arts degree) who chooses a second major in Applied Mathematical Economics (Bachelor of Science degree) must fulfill all of the degree requirements for Mathematics but only the major requirements for Applied Mathematical Economics. In either case, only one degree is granted. The transcript lists both majors, however.

A student may declare no more than two majors and one minor, or one major and two minors. Students are not required to choose a second major or an academic minor.

Any change of major or minor is accomplished by means of a Declaration or Change of Major/Minor Form.

A student who, in the judgment of the faculty of an academic department, possesses truly unusual creative ability may be accepted into an individual course of study appropriate to the student’s needs. Privileged status for a student in terms of an individual course of study is contingent upon prior approval by the Faculty Assembly, based on a recommendation from the Academic Policies Council.

Second Undergraduate Degrees

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An individual may pursue a second undergraduate degree in a new field to fulfill a different academic objective but may not concurrently pursue two undergraduate degrees at Oswego. An individual who seeks admission/readmission to earn a second undergraduate degree must

  1. meet with an academic advisor in the major to develop a program of study;
  2. submit that program of study to the appropriate dean’s office for approval before registering for coursework;
  3. complete and pass a minimum of 30 hours of coursework at Oswego after admission/readmission;
  4. complete a minimum of one-half of the major and concentration requirements at Oswego after admission/readmission.

Students admitted to pursue a second undergraduate degree begin with a new (0.00) GPA.

Academic Minor

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An academic minor is an approved course sequence within an area, a specialty within a discipline, or a specialty integrating more than one discipline. The area in which a student takes a minor is recorded on the student’s transcript provided that the minor is completed with a minimum GPA of 2.0. Students are not required to take an academic minor.

Students who want to declare a minor are to obtain approval from their major advisor and from the department offering the minor or, in the case of interdisciplinary minors, approval from the coordinator of the minor. The declaration of minor follows the same procedures and uses the same forms that are used to declare majors. The student, the major advisor, and a designated member in the minor area of study are to develop an appropriate minor course sequence for the student, subject to the limitations prescribed by the minor. Advisement and the certification of successful completion of the minor requirements will be done by the designated faculty members in the major and minor areas of study.

Although some minors are identical to the teacher education concentration requirements, students should note that such a minor, if taken without the professional teacher education major program, will not lead to eligibility for initial certification to teach in New York State.

Registration

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A student is not considered officially registered for credit until the registration procedures are completed and the bill is paid. Prior to the start of each semester and session, information relating to registration is available on the web at www.oswego.edu/registrar. Students in good academic standing who have not attended for a semester must contact the Registrar’s Office for readmission. Students registering after the published deadline are charged a late registration fee.

In order to verify students’ registration, email notification is issued, every semester after the ADD/DROP Period, to all undergraduate and graduate students. The notification directs students to myOswego to identify any discrepancies between the courses and/or sections they are attending and the ones for which they are officially registered. It is the students’ responsibility to report discrepancies, within ten days of receipt of the email notification, to the Registrar’s Office.

All students should use their myOswego account to monitor their student information. The student’s myOswego account is a web based student information account found at myoswego.oswego.edu. Students should use myOswego to register during prescribed registration periods, check course availability during semester course planning, check semester final grades, verify their course schedule, and other personal, registration, financial, and account procedures.

Transfer Within the College

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The principal academic components of SUNY Oswego are the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences; the School of Business; the School of Communication, Media and the Arts; and the School of Education.

A student who wants to transfer from one college or school to another, or to another curriculum within a college or school, must submit a completed Declaration and Change of Major/Minor/Advisor Form to the Office of the Registrar. Forms and directions for transfer are available in the offices of the college or schools and the Registrar’s Office. Note that transfers to certain programs may be restricted due to the large student demand for these programs. See the section “Restriction on Enrollment in Specified Programs” in the CURRICULUM INFORMATION section of this catalog.

Transfer from a college or school is normally prohibited if the student’s cumulative GPA is below 2.0.

The undergraduate degree program of any full-time matriculated student is expected to be completed in eight marking periods. A program must be completed within a maximum of twelve marking periods of full-time enrollment. Full-time enrollment is defined as any marking period in which the student registers for twelve or more credit hours.

Student Retention and Placement After Graduation

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The high academic standards maintained by the College, changes in students’ career plans, or similar reasons result in students leaving the College without finishing a degree program. The approximate attrition rates by class for students who enter the College as freshmen are: 24% for freshmen, 11% for sophomores, 5% for juniors and 5% for seniors. For transfer students the approximate rates are: 25% for juniors and 10% for seniors.

In an effort to reduce these numbers to a minimum, the College provides an extensive advisement system which starts before students arrive on the campus and continues throughout their program at Oswego. Students are urged to use this system to forestall academic problems.

Each year, the Office of Career Services conducts an extensive study to determine the first positions obtained by graduates within nine months after commencement. The complete report entitled “Follow-up Study of Baccalaureate Graduates” contains detailed information about the status of graduates in each major and provides a listing of job titles and salaries obtained by graduates. A copy of this report may be reviewed upon request in the Career Services Office, on the web site (www.oswego.edu/careerservices), or at the Reserve Desk in Penfield Library.

General Curricular Information

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Campus Wide Requirements

  1. Students enrolled in Arts and Sciences, Communication, Media and the Arts, Wellness Management, Childhood or Adolescence Education, and all School of Business programs must complete 122 credit hours of academic work to earn the bachelor’s degree. Students enrolled in the Vocational Teacher Preparation program must complete 126-127 hours with 66-67 hours in professional courses and 60 hours in liberal arts. Students enrolled in Technology Education must complete 128 hours with 68 hours in professional courses and 60 hours in liberal arts. Students in the BFA program in Art must complete 123 credit hours.
  2. Students seeking the Bachelor of Arts degree must earn 90 of the 122 credit hours in liberal arts courses. Liberal arts courses are all courses in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences; the School of Communication, Media and the Arts; the Department of Health Promotion and Wellness; and any course approved for General Education credit (including writing plan courses).
  3. Students seeking the Bachelor of Science degree in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences must also complete 90 of the 122 credit hours in liberal arts courses. Students seeking the Bachelor of Science degree in all Business Administration programs must complete 66 of the 122 credit hours in liberal arts courses. Students seeking the Bachelor of Science degree in Technology Education or in Vocational Teacher Preparation must complete 60 credit hours in liberal arts courses. Students seeking the Bachelor of Science degree in Childhood Education or Adolescence Education must complete 75 credit hours in liberal arts courses.
  4. Students seeking the Bachelor of Arts degree may count no more than 54 credit hours in one discipline toward the degree in order to affirm the breadth of study implied in the Bachelor of Arts degree.
  5. All students are required to complete at least 42 credit hours in courses numbered 300 to 499 in order to demonstrate that their study has progressed from the general to the specific, and from the basic to the advanced.

Specific Curricular Information

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The curriculum may be divided roughly into four parts: (1) general education, (2) the major field, (3) cognate requirements for the major, and (4) electives.

  1. The general education segment has seven components: Basic Skills; Foreign Language; Knowledge Foundations; America and the Western Heritage; Human Diversity; Intellectual Issues; and Advanced Expository Writing. These components are explained in greater detail in the next section and in Table I (General Education Requirements).
  2. The major field section of the degree program gives students an opportunity to specialize in the academic or professional field of their choice. See the specific major listing for the major field requirements.
  3. Cognate requirements are courses not offered in the major department, but which support and complement the major. For example, students majoring in a science would be severely handicapped if they did not develop certain mathematical skills. Therefore, mathematics is a cognate requirement for majors in the sciences. See the specific major listing for the cognate requirements.
  4. Elective courses bring the student’s total number of credit hours to the 122 (123 for BFA in Art, 127 for Technology Education and Technology Management, and 126-127 for Vocational Teacher Preparation majors) required for graduation. Although there is generally no restriction placed on electives, each student must be careful to earn the appropriate number of credit hours in liberal arts courses, including health and physical education courses, and in courses numbered 300 or higher.

General Education Requirements

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The College’s current general education program incorporates a set of requirements (the “SUNY-GER”—see Table IA) approved by the Board of Trustees of the State University of New York in December 1998 for all baccalaureate-granting SUNY units and locally designed requirements. The General Education Program applies to all new students—transfers as well as freshmen. (For information on the exceptions to this rule and on other general education issues for the transfer student, see the next section on “General Education Requirements for Transfer Students.”)

In its entirety, General Education at Oswego is intended to introduce students to a range of academic disciplines; teach them to think critically; solve problems; communicate effectively; increase their knowledge of the world and of themselves; and help them grow and mature as learners. Specifically, students are expected to develop:

  • Effective skills in writing, research and oral communication
  • Computer and information literacy
  • Analytical and critical inquiry skills
  • An understanding of the methods and findings of disciplines in the natural sciences and the social and behavioral sciences
  • Knowledge of the conventions and methods of a discipline in the humanities
  • Understanding of one form of artistic expression and the creative process associated with it
  • Basic proficiency in a foreign language
  • Competence in quantitative reasoning skills
  • Knowledge of the history of the United States,Western Civilization, and at least one non-western civilization
  • Understanding of diversity and its consequences in the United States
  • Experience in synthesizing different perspectives and modes of analysis to generate insights into complex issues

Basic Skills (refer to Table I for this and each subsequent general education requirement category) are the fundamental college-level skills in writing, information literacy, and critical thinking that students need to succeed in most of their college courses. A three-credit course (or its equivalent) is required in writing and information literacy; the critical thinking requirement is met via infusion in the student’s major. Some students have already developed these skills before entering Oswego in Advanced Placement (AP) work in high school, in course work at other colleges, or in other ways. Those students will not be required to take additional course work to satisfy requirements.

The Foreign Language requirement ensures that students acquire basic proficiency in the understanding and use of a language other than English, as well as knowledge of the distinctive features of a culture or cultures associated with the language they study. This requirement, too, can be satisfied through extensive study at the high school level (see Table I for details).

The purpose of Knowledge Foundations courses is to expose students to a breadth of knowledge through the exploration of different scholarly disciplines at the introductory level. Knowledge Foundations courses introduce students to the basic content and mode of inquiry and analysis of the disciplines selected. Courses must be taken in the following five areas: Fine and Performing Arts (one course); Humanities (one course); Mathematics (one course); Natural Sciences (two courses); and Social and Behavioral Sciences (two courses). Table I explains the kinds of exemptions based on major course work that can be earned in this category by students in most departments.

America and the Western Heritage entails course work in US History and the study of Western Civilization. The purpose of courses in American History is to enable students to develop knowledge of a basic narrative of the history of the United States (political, economic, social, and cultural, including knowledge of unity and diversity in American society); knowledge of common institutions in American society and how they have affected different groups; and understanding of America’s evolving relationship with the rest of the world. The purpose of courses in Western Civilization is to enable students to develop knowledge of the distinctive features of the history, institutions, economy, society, and culture of Western civilization, and to relate the development of Western Civilization to that of other regions of the world.

The Human Diversity requirement has two parts: 1) Tolerance and Intolerance in the United States; and 2) Non-Western Civilizations. Courses satisfying the first part will help students understand the complex roles different peoples have played in the forging of American society and the different ways in which they have experienced tolerance and intolerance, equality and discrimination, freedom and restraint, and justice and injustice. Courses satisfying the Non-Western Civilizations segment of the requirement will enable students to develop knowledge of the distinctive features of the history, institutions, economy, society, and culture of one or more non-Western civilizations.

Intellectual Issues courses investigate the multi-disciplinary and interpretive nature of intellectual inquiry, building upon students’ skills, abilities, and knowledge foundations. These courses are also intended to engage students as active learners by challenging them to think analytically and creatively about complex issues or themes. Students must select one three-credit upper-division Issues course from the category labeled “Explorations in the Natural Sciences” and one from either “Cultures and Civilizations” or “Self and Society. ”

The Advanced Expository Writing requirement mandates that students take at least five courses that include a writing component, as well as training in research. The faculty of each major determine which courses can be used by students in that major to satisfy the requirement. Typically, all five courses will also satisfy other major or general education requirements. The writing plan for each major or discipline is designed to ensure that students write frequently and develop the research and communication skills appropriate to that discipline. The Oral Proficiency mandate requires that every major or discipline provide a plan that concentrates on developing students’ proficiency in oral discourse and in evaluating oral presentations made by others.

Approved General Education Courses - The faculty of the College, through the General Education Council, certify courses as appropriate to fulfill all of the above general education requirements. A list of the courses approved by the General Education Council is available at the website www.oswego.edu/gened.

General Education Requirements for Transfer Students

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Transfer students must complete the General Education requirements (see Table I) with courses taken at Oswego, with credits transferred from their previous college(s), or with courses taken off-campus or on-line with prior approval. Transfer students who first matriculated at another unit of the State University of New York prior to fall 2000 should contact the Director of General Education or consult the General Education website (www.oswego.edu/gened).

All transfer students will have their prior college course work evaluated by the Admissions Office for general education credit. New transfers coming to Oswego from any other SUNY units will have a general education transcript addendum (GETA) that identifies courses already taken that satisfy specific SUNY-GER requirements. All transfer students must fulfill the SUNY-GER in its entirety (see Table IA), as well as all “local” general education requirements.

Students who transfer to Oswego with 60 or more credits are exempt from any lower-division writing courses required for their majors, but they must still take the required upper-division writing courses for that major and demonstrate oral proficiency.

Articulation Provisions for Students with Associates Degrees from other SUNY Units

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Transfer students entering Oswego with two-year associate’s degrees (AA,AS, or AAS) from other units of SUNY are covered by “general articulation, ” which confers on those students the following four exemptions:

Exemption 1: Computer and Information Literacy is considered to be “infused”;
Exemption 2: Critical Thinking is considered to be “infused”;
Exemption 3: The student is exempted from the second course (3 credits) required in Knowledge of Foundation-Natural Sciences;
Exemption 4: The student is exempted from the second course (3 credits) required in Knowledge Foundation-Social and Behavioral Sciences.

Transfer students with two-year associate’s degrees from other SUNY units also have alternative ways to meet the Knowledge Foundation requirements in Mathematics and in Foreign Language:

Mathematics: The degree-holding transfer student who has not yet satisfied the Mathematics component of the SUNY-GER may do so with a course at Oswego (or elsewhere) equivalent to any of those approved for that requirement at the SUNY unit from which that student received his or her degree;
Foreign Language: The degree-holding transfer student who has not yet satisfied the Foreign Language component of the SUNY-GER may do so with a 101-level course at Oswego (or elsewhere) equivalent to any of those approved for that requirement at the SUNY unit from which that student received his or her degree. In accordance with SUNY system policy, the degree-holding transfer student may also fulfill the foreign language requirement with three years of high school foreign language study and a score of 85 or above on the appropriate Regents exam.

Students should go to the SUNY Oswego General Education web page, www.oswego.edu/gened, and follow the link to SUNY-Wide General Education courses for a list of approved mathematics and foreign language courses at each two-year school.

All other unmet General Education Requirements must be completed with approved Oswego courses.

It is important to note that these articulation provisions do not apply to transfer students entering Oswego from institutions outside of SUNY or to those arriving from a SUNY unit without an associate’s degree.

Table I: General Education

Credit Hours
BASIC SKILLS REQUIREMENTS 0-6
Students are required to show competence (by passing an approved course or waiver exam) in each of the following:  
  1.Writing 0-3
  2. Computer and Information Literacy 0-3
  3. Critical Thinking: infused in the major; students should contact major department and advisor for details.  
FOREIGN LANGUAGE 0-6
  4. This requirement can be satisfied by a) successful high school study of a foreign language through Regents Level 4; b) successful high school study of two foreign languages (through Regents Level 2 in each); or c) completion of a 102-level foreign language course (or its equivalent) in college. Students must demonstrate basic competency in a language by successfully completing either a 101-level college foreign language course or three years of foreign language study in high school prior to registering for a 102-level college course in the same foreign language. The requirement may be satisfied by an equivalent proficiency in a Native American language, as demonstrated by comparable high school study (i.e. four years) or by an interview with a faculty member competent in the language in question. Non-native-English-speaking international students who have passed the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) exam upon acceptance to the College are exempted from this requirement.  
KNOWLEDGE FOUNDATIONS REQUIREMENTS 12-21
Students are required to take one or two approved courses (as indicated) in each area:  
  5. Fine and Performing Arts 3
  6. Humanities 3
  7. Mathematics — Students must demonstrate basic competency in mathematics prior to registering for Math courses numbered 106/206. Competency may be demonstrated by a) passing a mathematics competency exam approved by the Mathematics Department; or b) successful completion of MAX 105. 3
  8. Natural Sciences — In Natural Sciences, students must take courses from two different departments (Biological Sciences, Chemistry, Earth Sciences, or Physics). In Social and Behavioral Sciences, students must take courses from two different disciplines. The total number of hours is given as 12-21 instead of 21 because the nature of the course work required of students to fulfill certain majors infuses a level of skills, competency, and/or general knowledge beyond what is needed to satisfy General Education. In those cases, students are considered to be exempt from particular General Education components. A list of exemptions by major is available at the website, www.oswego.edu/gened. The student who completes a minor is credited with having satisfied three hours of the requirement in the area of the minor. 6
  9. Social and Behavioral Sciences 6
AMERICA AND THE WESTERN HERITAGE 6
Students are required to take 1 approved course in each area:  
  10. American History — No course satisfying the American History requirement will at the same time satisfy the Tolerance and Intolerance in the United States requirement (in Human Diversity). 3
  11. Western Civilization 3
HUMAN DIVERSITY 6
Students are required to take one approved course in each area:  
  12. Tolerance and Intolerance in the United States  No course satisfying the American History requirement will at the same time satisfy the Tolerance and Intolerance in the United States requirement (in Human Diversity). 3
  13. Non-Western Civilizations 3
INTELLECTUAL ISSUES 6
Students are required to take one approved course in:  
  14. Explorations in the Natural Sciences and one approved course in either: 3
  15a. Cultures and Civilizations—OR—15b. Self and Society 3
ADVANCED EXPOSITORYWRITING AND ORAL PROFICIENCY  
Students must take five courses approved by their major department that emphasize training in writing and research skills appropriate to the major discipline. Students must develop skills in oral communication as well (see major department’s writing and oral communication plans for details). These requirements may be satisfied with courses that meet other general education or major requirements.

GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES CANNOT BE TAKEN PASS-FAIL. UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED, ONE COURSE CAN BE TAKEN TO SATISFY TWO OR MORE DIFFERENT REQUIREMENTS, AS LONG AS IT IS OFFICIALLY APPROVED FOR THOSE REQUIREMENTS. GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES (WITH THE EXCEPTION OF INTELLECTUAL ISSUES) CAN BE TAKEN OFF-CAMPUS, AS LONG AS APPROVAL IS SECURED IN ADVANCE.

Table IA: General Education at SUNY Oswego and the SUNY General Education

Oswego Requirement   SUNY GE (corresponds to the category)
KNOWLEDGE & SKILL AREAS    
1. Knowledge Foundations: Mathematics   Mathematics
2. Knowledge Foundations: Natural Sciences   Natural Sciences
3. Knowledge Foundations:Social Sciences   Social Sciences
4. American History   American History
5. Western Civilization   Western Civilization
6. Human Diversity: Non-Western Civilizations   Other World Civilizations
7. Humanities   Hum
8. Knowledge Foundations: Fine and Performing Arts   The Arts
9. Foreign Language   Foreign Language
10. Basic Skills:Writing   Basic Communication
COMPETENCIES    
11. Basic Skills: Critical Thinking   Critical Thinking/Reasoning
12. Basic Skills: Computer and Information Literacy   Information Management
     
Note: In addition to the SUNY-wide General Education Requirements, Oswego students must fulfill local general education requirements in Tolerance and Intolerance in the United States and Intellectual Issues. (See Table I)

Academic Load

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A student must carry a minimum of 12 credit hours per semester to be considered a full-time student. An undergraduate student is permitted to register for a maximum of 17 credit hours. Exceptions are made for students majoring in Technology Education, Vocational Teacher Preparation, and for graduating seniors whose programs require more than 17 credits. All other students who elect to register for more than 17 credit hours may do so at the beginning of the semester with their advisor’s written permission on an ADD/DROP Form.

Student Workload

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The average student workload is two hours of work outside of class for every credit hour of course work. Thus students who carry a 15 credit hour load are expected to spend an additional 30 hours per week in study, preparation, and similar academic pursuits.

Class Standing

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A student’s class standing is determined by the number of hours of credit earned: freshman, 0 through 26 hours; sophomore, 27 through 56 hours; junior, 57 through 86 hours; senior, over 86 hours.

Non-Degree and Visiting Student Status

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A non-degree student is one who has been accepted to the College for course work only and who has not fulfilled entrance requirements for matriculation as a degree candidate. Non-degree students are limited to a maximum of 11 credit hours per semester and a cumulative total of 22 credit hours, with the following exceptions: (1) students holding an undergraduate degree who are following a recommended program for teacher certification; (2) students matriculated and in good standing at another college who, with approval, are taking work to fulfill degree requirements; and (3) students admitted under the State University Visiting Student Program. Application for enrollment as a non-degree or visiting student should be made through the College Admissions Office.

Catalog Curricular Requirements

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A student is permitted to graduate under the program of study in effect at the time of admission provided that the student’s attendance at Oswego is not interrupted by an absence of more than two academic years. If a student’s attendance is interrupted by an absence of more than two academic years, the student will be required to graduate under the program of study in effect at the time of readmission to the College. Approved off-campus study in overseas academic programs, internships and the visiting student program is considered study in residence.

Courses

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Unit of Credit

The credit hour is the course unit of credit, representing the satisfactory completion of one class period per week for one semester. Thus a course having three class periods a week willtypically generate three credit hours. Studio and laboratory class periods earn one credit hour for each two hours of attendance unless otherwise indicated.

Course Numbering

Courses are numbered as follows:

100-199 – Courses without prerequisites
200-299 – Courses may have some prerequisites
300-399 – Courses with intermediate level difficulty and prerequisites
400-499 – Courses with advanced level difficulty and prerequisites
500-599 – Graduate level courses
600-699 – Two year graduate Certificate of Advanced Study Program students only

Frequency of Course Offerings

Each course listed in this Catalog has a designation indicating the marking period when it is normally taught. These designations are: Fl–Fall semester, Sp–Spring semester, SS–Summer Sessions or Ir–Irregular basis. Due to the dynamic nature of the College’s academic program, these designations should be used only as guides for when any particular course will be offered.

Note that all of the courses listed in this Catalog will not necessarily be offered during the academic year covered by the Catalog. Those courses which will be offered during any particular marking period will be listed on the campus website.

Credit for Military Educational Experiences

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Limited course credit may be granted for educational experience received while in military service. Such experience will be evaluated in terms of its relation to degree requirements. The credit awarded may not be used to meet major program requirements without departmental approval. Inquiries regarding credit for military educational experiences should be directed to the Office of the Registrar, Records Area.

Approval for Off Campus Study

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Students may, with prior approval, take course work at other accredited colleges and universities and transfer the credit to their record at Oswego. Students should note that courses may be taken off-campus in every General Education category except Intellectual Issues; the six-credit upper-division requirement in that area must be met with course work at Oswego.

Courses from community colleges will be accepted for lower division credit only. A maximum of 62 credit hours of lower division credit may be applied toward the Oswego bachelor’s degree. Credit only is transferred for work taken at other institutions. Off-campus study does not become a part of a student’s record unless an Off-Campus Study Approval Form, signed by the student’s advisor, chairperson of the department in which the equivalent campus course is taught or, where applicable, the Director of General Education, is submitted to the Registrar’s Office in advance of completing the coursework.

Independent Studies, Internships and Practica

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Students may earn academic credit for independent studies and practica. Internships are graded Honors (H), Satisfactory (S), or Unsatisfactory (U) only. An explanation of each type of study, the eligibility requirements that a student must meet to enroll, and the maximum number of credit hours that may be earned in each type of study are outlined in the following paragraphs. No more than 21 credit hours of any combination of independent studies, internships and practica may be counted toward the hours needed for graduation. For more information on Internships and Service Learning contact the Office of Experience-Based Education (www.oswego.edu/ebe).

Independent Studies

Students of exceptional ability and promise may enroll for independent studies for degree credit provided they meet the requirements stipulated below. The term, independent study, may mean (1) independent readings, (2) independent projects, or (3) independent study for honors. Students are eligible for independent readings or independent projects if they have completed a minimum of sixty (60) hours of college credit. In addition, they must have a cumulative average of at least 3.0 in the discipline to be studied, unless the independent study is required for the completion of the major. Independent study for honors requires the completion of a minimum of sixty (60) hours and the achievement of a 3.2 cumulative average in the discipline to be studied.

In addition to the stipulated limitations for each type of independent study, the following restrictions also apply: (1) a student may register for no more than six hours of any combination of independent studies in a given semester, (2) a maximum of 12 hours of any combination of independent studies may be counted within a major, and six hours toward a minor or concentration, and (3) a student may count no more than 15 hours of any combination of independent studies toward the hours needed for graduation.

Independent Readings

This form of independent study is an independent reading program directed and evaluated by a professor, who will determine the eligibility of the student on the basis of minimum standards set by the department which are consistent with or exceed the above College standards.

To initiate the study, a student must prepare a reading list in consultation with a professor specializing in the subject area. The student should also prepare a statement on the topic and objectives of the proposed readings, the number of credit hours sought, and the methods by which the professor will supervise and evaluate the student’s work for an appropriate letter grade. When the professor has accepted the student’s proposal, it shall be submitted to the department chair for approval. Copies of the proposal are to be signed and held by the student, the supervising professor, and the chair.

Entries on the student’s transcript will be labeled “Independent Readings in… ” and numbered 399 or 499 depending on the degree of sophistication of the readings. No student may count more than 15 hours of independent reading credit toward the hours needed for graduation.

Independent Project

Independent work on a project or problem is directed and evaluated by a professor who will determine the eligibility of the student on the basis of minimum standards set by the department which are consistent with or exceed the above College standards.

To initiate the study, a student must prepare a written plan of study within a professor’s area of specialization. The plan of study will specify the topic, objectives, and approach of the project, the number of credit hours sought, and the methods by which the professor will supervise and evaluate it for an appropriate letter grade. When the professor has accepted the student’s proposal, it shall be submitted to the department chair for approval. Copies of the plan of study are to be signed and held by the student, the supervising professor, and the chair.

Entries on the student’s transcript will be labeled “Independent Project in… ” and numbered 399.

Independent Study for Honors

To be eligible for this activity, a student must have completed at least 60 credit hours, 15 credit hours in the subject area, and have a cumulative grade point average of 3.2 or better.

Students wishing to engage in this independent academic activity must prepare a written plan of study within a professor’s area of specialization. The plan of study will specify the topic, objectives, and approach of the project, the number of credit hours sought, and the methods by which the professor will supervise and evaluate it for an appropriate letter grade. When the professor has accepted the student’s proposal, it shall be submitted to the department chair for approval. Copies of the plan of study are to be signed and held by the student, the supervising professor, and the chair.

Entries on the student’s transcript will be labeled “Independent Study for Honors in… ” and numbered 499.

Internship

An internship is the supervised placement of a student in business, industry, a social or governmental agency, or other work setting for a specified period and for an appropriate number of credit hours. It is an upper division learning experience, different from both independent studies and practica. The goal of an internship is to afford students an opportunity to apply their theoretical background and skills to an experiential situation. In most instances, students will have completed the relevant theoretical course work before planning an internship experience. In those instances where that has not occurred, appropriate coursework and/or independent study should be scheduled concurrently with the internship experience. If independent study is prescribed, the Independent Study Policy should be reviewed to ensure that the appropriate procedures/policies are followed.

In order to be eligible for an internship, a student must have completed at least 60 credit hours of college work, have a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.5, and have fulfilled all other departmental prerequisites. Internships are graded “Honors,” “Satisfactory,” and “Unsatisfactory” (H, S, and U). Qualified students shall prepare a learning agreement for the internship with the guidance of the sponsoring professor. The proposal will include the name of the agency where the student will be placed, the name of the site supervisor, the academic objectives of the internship, the nature of the work experience, the number of credit hours to be earned, and the procedures by which the internship will be supervised and evaluated for a grade.

After the learning agreement is completed and signed by the student, the sponsor/instructor and the program director, it must be reviewed and approved by the department chair and the student’s academic advisor. As a final step in the approval process, the agreement must be submitted to the office of the dean of the student’s major or minor. Agreements should be forwarded to the dean’s office as soon as possible after the prior advance registration period, but no later than the end of the sixth full day of classes of the semester in which the student is doing the internship. Site supervisors will be requested to sign the agreement at the time the internship begins. The copy signed by the site supervisor will be forwarded to the director of Experience-Based Education and placed in the student’s folder.

A student serving an internship will be supervised jointly by a professor from the sponsoring academic department and the professional with whom the internship is being served. The student will be required to submit a scholarly report analyzing, synthesizing, and evaluating the experience. This report, together with the field supervisor’s report and, where practicable, the faculty member’s field evaluation, shall provide the primary basis from which the faculty sponsor will assign a grade for the internship.

Entries on a student’s transcript for such experiences will be labeled “Internship in…” and numbered 498. A student may register for no more than one internship per semester, and may count no more than 12 credit hours of internship credit toward a major or 6 credit hours toward a minor or concentration. No more than 15 hours of internship credit may be counted toward fulfilling requirements for the BA, BF, or BS degrees, and no more than 21 hours of any combination of independent studies, internships and practica may be credited toward the hours needed for graduation.

Practica

A practicum is a regularly scheduled course which combines a formal classroom instruction with supervised field work in a subject area. It is an upper division course, presupposing considerable background in the area, and is different from both independent studies and internships.

To be eligible for a practicum, a student must have fulfilled all departmental prerequisites. Student evaluation will be the responsibility of the faculty member teaching the practicum in consultation with the field supervisor.

A student may register for no more than one practicum per semester and may count no more than 12 credit hours of practicum credit toward the major and no more than six hours toward a minor or concentration. For more information on Internships and Service Learning contact the Office of Experience Based Education.

Taking Graduate Courses for Undergraduate Credit

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Seniors may petition for permission to be admitted to graduate courses (500-599) for undergraduate credit if they meet the following terms and conditions:

  1. The student has at least a 3.25 cumulative quality point index in the student’s major and at least a 3.00 cumulative quality point index for all college work credit at Oswego.
  2. The student has the approval of the student’s advisor and the instructor of the course, and the chair of the department in which the course is offered certifies to the appropriate Dean that the student is qualified to take the course and that the student would substantially benefit by participation in this graduatecourse.
  3. The completed petition and supporting documents must be submitted to the appropriate dean prior to the deadline for adding courses. The dean will maintain the appropriate records, will arrange the proper award of credit and will ensure the integrity of graduate level course.
  4. In exceptional circumstances a student who does not meet the above requirements may petition through the chair to the appropriate dean for permission to enroll in graduate level courses.
  5. A graduate course used for undergraduate credit cannot later be used for graduate credit.

Taking Graduate Courses for Graduate Credit (Combined Enrollment)

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Seniors who need nine hours or fewer to graduate may petition for combined enrollment if they meet the following terms and conditions:

  1. The student must complete a petition form for combined enrollment which may be secured at the Graduate Office.
  2. The student has at least a 3.25 cumulative quality point index in the student’s major and at least a 3.00 cumulative quality point index for all college work credited at Oswego. In exceptional circumstances a student who does not meet this requirement may petition through the chair of the department in which the course is offered to the appropriate dean for permission to enroll in graduate level courses.
  3. The student has the approval of the student’s advisor and the instructor of the course, and the chair of the department in which the course is offered certifies to the appropriate dean that the student is qualified to take the course and that the student would substantially benefit by participation in this graduate course.
  4. The student’s class load cannot exceed 12 credit hours unless permission is requested by the student’s advisor and approved by the appropriate dean to increase the total to a maximum of 15 credit hours.
  5. The completed petition and supporting documents must be submitted to the appropriate dean prior to the deadline for adding courses. The dean will maintain the appropriate records, will arrange the proper award of credit and will ensure the integrity of the graduate level courses.
  6. Granting of combined enrollment graduate credit is contingent upon completion of undergraduate degree requirements. Should, for any reason, a student taking courses for combined enrollment not graduate at the end of the semester, all graduate credit will automatically revert to undergraduate credit.

Proficiency Examination Credit

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Any undergraduate at Oswego may receive a maximum of thirty credit hours and with departmental approval may receive up to a maximum of twelve credit hours toward a major program via a sufficient grade or score on a recognized proficiency examination. A grade of C or higher must be obtained on the New York State College Proficiency Examinations or a score of 50 or higher must be achieved on the Subject Examinations of the College-Level Examination Program of the College Entrance Examination Board. The minimum acceptable scores on the General Examinations in the CLEP series are as follows: English (530), Humanities (421), Mathematics (421), Natural Sciences (421), Social Sciences-History (421). However, a student who has received credit for an advanced course (300 level or above) in a given major program cannot receive proficiency credit via the above examinations for a lower level course in the same major program.

Achievement of a sufficient grade or score on a recognized proficiency examination is an acceptable substitute for a corresponding course offering in which the student has received a failing grade (E), provided the course is not a requirement in the student’s major program. All students passing such a proficiency examination under such a situation shall receive a recorded grade of C.

Oswego has established a proficiency examination program to serve students who seek recognition for achievement acquired outside the conventional college classroom. The program has been established to help those students entering Oswego as well as those already matriculated. Described below are the proficiency examinations recognized by Oswego for college credit. Any undergraduate at Oswego may receive a maximum of 30 credit hours of credit and with departmental approval may receive up to a maximum of 12 hours of credit toward a major program via proficiency examinations.

Advanced Placement

The Advanced Placement Program (AP) of the College Entrance Examination Board is designed to enable students to pursue college-level studies while still in secondary school. Examinations are available in 29 different areas. The exams are graded on a five-point scale; in order to receive Oswego credit a score of three or higher must be earned. Credit for the successful completion of each exam is awarded in the following manner.

Examination Minimum Score Credit Hours
American History 3-4 3
American History 5 6
Art History 3 3
Art General Studies 3 3
Art Studio Drawing 3 3
Art 2-D Design 3 3
Art 3-D Design 3 3
Biology 4-5 4
Calculus AB 3 4
Calculus BC 3 8
Chemistry 3 8
Computer Science A 3 3
Economics Micro 3 3
Economics Macro 3 3
English Lang/Comp 3 6
English Comp/Lit 3 6
Environmental Science 3 3
European History 3-4 3
European History 5 6
French Literature 3 6
French Language 3 6
German Language 3 6
German Literature 3 6
Government & Politics American 3 3
Government & Politics Comparative 3 3
Human Geography 3 3
Music History/Literature 3 3
Music Theory 3 3
Physics B* 3 4
Physics B* 4-5 8
Physics C* 3 4
Physics C* 4-5 8
Physics CE-M* 3 4
Physics CE-M* 4-5 8
Psychology 3 3
Spanish Language 3 6
Spanish Literature 3 6
Statistics 3 3
World History 3 3

*Total Physics credit may not exceed 11 credit hours.

Information about the program may be obtained from the Admissions Office or the College Board Advanced Placement Program, PO Box 6771, Princeton, NJ 08541.

College Level Examination Program (CLEP)

CLEP, offered by the College Board, is the most widely accepted credit-by-exam program in the country. Exams offered by CLEP include both General and Subject Examinations.

General Exams—with the exception of the English Composition with Essay exam, students may only receive Arts and Sciences elective credit for the successful completion of the General Exam(s).

English Composition with Essay Exam—Students who receive a score of 52 or more on the English Composition with Essay Exam will be exempted from the Basic Skills:Writing Requirement of the General Education Program. Students who receive a score between 50 and 51 will be awarded three credits of Arts and Sciences elective credit.

Subject Exams—Students may be exempted from specific courses by successfully completing a Subject Exam. A minimum score of 50 or more is required to be awarded credit.

General Examinations

Examination Minimum Score Credit Hours
English Composition 50 3
English Composition with Essay 52 3
Humanities 50 6
Mathematics 50 3
Natural Sciences 50 6
Social Sciences and History 50 6

Subject Examinations

Examination Minimum Score Credit Hours
American Government 50 3
American History I 50 3
American History II 50 3
American Literature 50 6
Analysis and Interpretation of Literature 50 6
Financial Accounting 50 6
Introductory Business Law 50 3
Intro. to Educational Psychology 50 3
Calculus with Elementary Functions 50 4
College Algebra 50 3
College French - Level 1 50 6
College French - Level 2 59 12
College German - Level 1 50 6
College German - Level 2 60 12
English Literature 50 6
General Biology 50 4
General Chemistry 50 6
Human Growth and Development 50 3
Information Systems and Computer Applications 50 3
Principles of Macroeconomics 50 3
Principles of Management 50 3
Principles of Marketing 50 3
Principles of Microeconomics 50 3
Introductory Psychology 50 3
Introductory Sociology 50 3
College Spanish - Level 1 50 6
College Spanish - Level 2 63 12
Western Civilization I 50 3
Western Civilization II 50 3
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